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Summary: Then they left that place and were passing through Galilee. Jesus didn’t want anyone to know it, for he was teaching his disciples and saying to them, "The Son of Man will be betrayed into human hands. They will kill him, but after being dead for three da

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Then they came to Capernaum. While Jesus was at home, he asked the disciples, "What were you arguing about on the road?" But they kept silent, for on the road they had argued with one another about who was the greatest.

So he sat down and called the twelve. He told them, "If anyone wants to be first he must be last of all and servant of all." Then he took a little child and had him stand among them. He took him in his arms and said to them, "Whoever welcomes a child like this in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me."

Q: What did John the Baptist, Atilla the Hun and Alexander the Great all have in common?

A: They all had the same unusual middle name - ’the’.

It’s not a common middle name any more (’the’), and neither is Alexander’s surname (’great’), though it’s not hard to come up with a goodly number of ’great’ historical figures: ’Herod the Great’, ’Peter the Great’, ’Alfred the Great’ and a host of other ’great’ men (and perhaps some women).

Perhaps there are some who stil aspire to the name, for the truth is that deep down all of us, even if we don’t aspire to the title, would nonetheless like to be ’great’. And not just great at what we do, but ’great’ in the sense of perceived as being great, in the same way the disciples in today’ Gospel reading wanted to be ’great’. It’s sorta natural.

Sigmund Freud was a brilliant man. I know he doesn’t get a lot of good press in church circles, but as R.D. Laing said of Freud, "no one went down further, stayed down longer, or came up dirtier than he did".

Freud, as you may know, believed that the lust for pleasure was at the basis of all human behaviour. Human beings naturally move towards pleasure and away from pain, and this is the basis of all human behaviour, said Freud. And I’m sure that there is indeed a great degree of truth in Freud’s analysis.

Alfred Adler though, who came somewhat after Freud, suggested that there was an even more fundamental driving force at work in the human psyche - greater still than our natural desure for pleasure, and it is the lust for power!

We human beings want to be significant. We want to be ’somebodies’. None of us wants to live his or her life as a ’nobody’ and die in obscurity and be remember for nothing. No, we want to be ’somebodies’. We want our life to count for something. We want to achieve something, and ultimately, get the recognition and authority and greatness that comes with being a somebody. In the end we want to be powerful. This, Adler suggests, is the fundamental driving, motivating force behind all human behaviour.

Now it’s not my place to promote the teachings of Freud or Adler of course, and yet I think we do well to recognise that there is a great degree of truth in both analyses, and perhaps especially in Adler’s recognition of the role our individual yearning for significance (or lust for power) plays in our behaviour.

We want to be great. We would like to be the greatest. And so we hang out with important people. We aim at securing big jobs for ourselves so that we can earn big salaries and live in big houses, because we want to be big!


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