Improve your sermon prep with our brand new study tools! Learn all about them here.
Sermons

Summary: As Jesus looked at the religious situation of his day, he saw that judging others had become a great religious problem. The Pharisees and scribes sat in the place of the critic. They were quick to pass judgment on those who didn’t live up to their expe

  Study Tools

Introduction:

As Jesus looked at the religious situation of his day, he saw that judging others had become a

great religious problem. The Pharisees and scribes sat

in the place of the critic. They were quick to pass judgment on those who didn’t live up to their

expectations.

I. Don’t Judge (Matthew 7:1-2)

When Jesus was in the house of Simon the Pharisee and the sinful woman anointed his feet,

Simon said, "This man, if he were a prophet, would know who and what manner of woman this is

who is touching him, for she is a sinner." (Luke 7:39). The Pharisees, in their self-righteous

arrogance, had created a special class of people called "sinners," as if they themselves were not

such.

Whenever we make a judgment, we do so based on what we have seen and sometimes that’s not

enough to provide the whole picture. Human judgment is limited to the information which we

put into it and sometimes that isn’t enough to make an accurate judgment.

The Indians had their way of saying this: "Don’t judge a man until you’ve walked a mile in his

moccasins."

But that goes to show the limits of what we sometimes see in other people. God once made the

point that "Man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart." (I Samuel

16:7). That’s why I don’t have the right to sit in judgment on someone else’s motives, because I

don’t know what they are. Only the Lord knows all.

II. Searching for Specks (Matthew 7:3-5)

There’s another problem with “Pharisee righteousness”. Not only was it overly critical, but it was

also hypocritical. It was two-faced. We like to look at people with bifocals. We use the bottom

part to see ourselves, and it has kind of a rosy tint to it. We tend to look past any shortcomings.

But the top part we use to look at others. And that’s the hypocrisy Jesus was denouncing.

It’s like the parable in Luke 18 where a goes to the temple to pray. The Pharisee looks through

the top part of his bifocals and says, "Oh my! I’m glad I’m not like that scumbag out there." And

then he looks through the bottom part and says to God, "You are just so blessed to have me on

your side." That’s the kind of judging Jesus condemned.

We’re not qualified to sit in judgment on others because it’s impossible to

be impartial -- we’re influenced by our own imperfections. Jesus here uses the graphic example

of a plank of wood and a speck of dust.

Even though we are unqualified, we still judge. And we often do so for selfish reasons; it makes

us feel better. If we have a problem with sin in our own lives, it takes a little pressure off to point

the finger at others for a while. It makes our sin seem not so bad after all. But, Jesus warns us

that we’ve got to clean up our own act before we tamper with the lives of others.

When I spend my time pointing my finger at your sin, my attention is distracted from my own

sins, and that’s the real danger of judging. We’re all sinners, and we’re to work together as a


Browse All Media

Related Media


Be Different
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Environment
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion