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Summary: An Evangelism Sermon

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Lightly Seasoned for Jesus

Matthew 5:1-16

Song: Shine on Me

Prayer

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[v. 13] Ye are the salt of the earth, but if the salt have lost its savour, with what shall it be salted? It is thereafter good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.”

[v. 14] Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hidden

[v. 15] Neither do men light a lamp, and put it under a bushel, but on a lampstand, and it giveth light unto all that are in the house

[v. 16] Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father, who is in Heaven.

Before we get started with out text -- allow me a brief moment to set the stage and give you a brief introduction as to what has taken place thus far in the Book of Matthew.

You see – The Gospel of Matthew was viewed as the most important Gospel by the early church, and is the Gospel most frequently quoted by writers of the first three centuries. During my research, I learned that the Gospel of Matthew [at that time, mind you] was directed primarily to the Jewish people. It contains at least 130 direct references or allusions to the Old Testament. The book shows that Jesus truly is the messianic King of Old Testament prophecy.

I want to point out to you this morning that there are several unique features of Matthew:

· Of which in 1,068 verses, 644 contain words of Jesus. That is why when you flip thru your Bible you with find that most of the pages in the Book of Matthew are in red.

· Three fifths of the Gospel is a report of Christ’s sayings.

· Among them 35 are parables.

The Gospel of Matthew also emphasizes both Jesus’ ethical teachings, and His es-cha-tological teaching (teaching about the future). Matthew’s Gospel records 20 of Jesus’ miracles, 3 of which are found only in this Gospel (the story of two blind men healed are recorded in Matt. 9:27–31, 9:32–33 records the healing of a man possessed by a devil; and 17:24–27 teaches us about the miracle of money in the mouth of a fish.

Perhaps -- the most striking feature of this Gospel, however, is the fact that while it affirms Old Testament prophecy of Jesus as Israel’s promised King, it also presents Him as -- a Servant.

Read your Bible for yourself and you will discover that “In Jesus, and only in Jesus, glory and humility, power and gentleness, are perfectly combined.”

I discovered that Matthew was concerned that his readers acknowledge Jesus as the promised Messiah of Israel. That is why chapter 1 traces Jesus’ genealogy and human ancestry back to Abraham, through David, whose offspring was promised an eternal throne [and you we learn more about that promise in two weeks in Sunday School, it’s known as the Davidic Covenant]. The purpose of the genealogy in chapter 1 was to show that the details of Jesus’ birth were in full harmony with the Old Testament.

Matthew Chapter 2 records the birth of Jesus -- then notice that the Gospel skips over Jesus’ childhood and adolescence. From the birth story it moves directly to introduce Jesus’ ministry.


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