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Summary: Mary’s Song talks about: 1. Forgiveness 2. Victory and 3. Covenant

Many people have been waiting since last January for the mystery to be revealed. The Internet has been abuzz about it. Variously called “Ginger” or just plain “It,” entrepreneur Dean Kamen, a college dropout, has been claiming that his invention, the Segway Human Transporter, will transform the world of transportation. Before its unveiling, Steve Jobs said it could be as significant as the personal computer. Kamen had earned a reputation as an inventor by creating the first insulin pump and the first portable kidney dialysis machine. Before it was unveiled, the rumor was that it was a hovercraft, helicopter backpack, or a teleportation pod like the Jetson’s used. Some said it would be hydrogen powered or be driven by the high-tech Stirling engine. So many people were waiting and wondering what it might be and when it would come. People have been talking about “It” on the Internet for almost a year, with all kinds of fantastic rumors being bandied about. The United States Postal Service, the National Park Service, and Amazon.com have all been using prototypes. But when it was actually unveiled for the first time on the Today Show, it was obvious that “It” was little more than a motorized scooter with some gyroscopes. Its average speed is 8 m.p.h. and can go as high as 12 m.p.h. It will cost around $3000 and has a range of only 15 miles. The 65 pound transporter cost over $90 million to develop. When Diane Sawyer saw it, she literally said, “That’s ‘It’?” It failed to live up to all the media hype. Someone called it a pogo stick on wheels. Others called it a mini-chariot or a skateboard on steroids. It is interesting, but obviously it will not change the world — not even the transportation industry.

Just before the birth of Jesus there was a similar sense of expectation and hope. People were waiting and wondering. They felt like something wonderful was about to happen. The Scriptures had promised the coming of the Messiah, and rumors were rampant that he was coming at any time. He was going to turn the world around and deliver Israel from all her enemies. He would usher in the kingdom of God. But if those same people, who were so high with expectation, had gone to a backyard stable in the town of Bethlehem one starry night, they might have said, “That’s it? All that hype for this?” But actually, in this case, the reality was greater than the expectation. No one could have guessed how this child would change the world. No one could have imagined the impact he would have on world history and the change he would make in people’s lives.

Not even Mary fully understood the difference the child she was carrying would make. She knew he would be something special, for an angel had visited her and told her what was going to happen. The Bible says, “In the sixth month, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee, to a virgin pledged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. The angel went to her and said, ‘Greetings, you who are highly favored! The Lord is with you.’ Mary was greatly troubled at his words and wondered what kind of greeting this might be. But the angel said to her, ‘Do not be afraid, Mary, you have found favor with God. You will be with child and give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever; his kingdom will never end’” (Luke 1:26-33). And in spite of her fear, and being overwhelmed by the presence of this powerful spiritual being, she said, “I am the Lord’s servant. May it be to me as you have said” (Luke 1:38). She had been thinking about all of this for quite awhile, and when she went to visit her relative, Elizabeth, her joy spilled into song.

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Dean Johnson

commented on Dec 3, 2013

Really loved the opening with the question of "That's all?"

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