Sermons

Summary: Open the door to life, adventure, and royalty.

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Introduction: Today we are concluding our sermon series based on C. S. Lewis’ classic Christian allegory, “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.” In this story, four British children enter through a wardrobe to a new land called Narnia. In this land, it is always winter, and never Christmas. Narnia is enchanted by the evil witch who corresponds to Satan, but the Christ-figure, Aslan redeems Narnia by giving up his life on a stone table, but then is resurrected to defeat evil once and for all. This book has sold over 85 million copies world-wide…is accepted in most public schools…and is an allegory of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

“The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” is also a major motion picture. In fact, we will be going opening night as a church—this Friday night, December 9th. We have purchased the entire 7:10 showing. We have 227 seats! This is more seats than we had for the Passion! We would like you to buy a ticket, and we will give you an evangelistic ticket for free. I believe this is one of our greatest evangelistic opportunities in recent years. So please be praying about a friend that you can take to this movie. You need to buy or reserve your ticket today…beginning tomorrow we will be releasing the tickets to other churches.

Two weeks ago, we looked at the lion’s roar, and discovered that he had a holy, loving, and winning roar. Last week the message was on the witch’s spell. The witch’s spell curses creation, lures lusts, hardens hearts, and fosters false-truths. Today we consider the wardrobe, with a message entitled “The Wardrobe’s Opportunity.” It is my prayer that this movie and this book, would stir up some holy imagination. If we would just have the courage to leave our humdrum, ordinary everyday existence…and walk through the wardrobe and experience the magic of Narnia…Narnia teaches us that first we must,

1. OPEN THE DOOR TO LIFE.

When Peter, Susan, and Lucy first meet Aslan, the dialogue goes like this, “Welcome Peter, Son of Adam,” said Aslan, “Welcome, Susan and Lucy, Daughers of Eve...” His voice was deep and rich and somehow took the fidgets out of them. They now felt glad and quiet and it didn’t seem awkward to them to stand and say nothing. “But where is the fourth?” asked Aslan. “He has tried to betray them and joined the White Witch, O Aslan,” said Mr. Beaver. And then something made Peter say, “That was partly my fault, Aslan. I was angry with him and I think that helped him to go wrong.” And Alsan said nothing either to excuse Peter or to blame him but merely stood looking at him with his great golden eyes. And it seemed to all of them that there was nothing to be said. “Please—Aslan,” said Lucy, “can anything be done to save Edmund.” “All shall be done,” said Aslan. “But it may be harder than your think.” (Chapter 12).

Aslan said that all would be done to save Edmund. None of the children realized the price that would have to be paid to redeem Edmund. As I describe in the message a couple of weeks ago, Aslan agrees to give up his life for Edmund the traitor. He is killed on the Stone Table for the sins of Edmund and all of Narnia. I have a friend who was talking about the movie to someone who said, “Isn’t there something biblical about the movie.” My friend replied… “Aslan is Jesus.” To which the person simply replied…oh…OH!” Jesus gave up His life for our sins and took our place on the cross. Romans 5:8 (NIV) But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.


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