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Summary: The moment we are born, we begin to age. We grow, develop, and then deteriorate ­ and our memory is one of the first things to go. Our only hope in life is this: God never changes. He is the one constant we can count on while everything around us ra

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Our Unchanging God

Now that my 40th birthday is in my rear-view mirror, I can laugh about all the cards and balloons I received. 90% of the cards I got made some kind of crack about how old 40 is ­ but a few people were kind to me ­ very few.

The staff gave me a little party on Tuesday complete with a black balloon that says, “Happy Birthday, you old buzzard!” We also celebrated with 40 candles on a chocolate covered donut. As a gift they gave me an oversized magnifying glass with the caption, “Midlife Crisis Magnifier” on the package.

One card I received said this on the outside: “Happy Birthday. I wouldn’t exactly say you’re old…but in some third world countries, you’d qualify as a tribal elder.”

One of my sisters sent me a card and then wrote on the inside, “You’re as old as dirt.”

Another one said, “Turning 40? Your face and body still look twenty-five. But there’s something in your eyes that says, ‘forty’ -- tears, I think they’re called.

I don’t think I’ve changed a bit from when I was young. Here’s the evidence…(show pictures in PowerPoint).

The elders were giving me a hard time Tuesday night about my memory going. Apparently that happens when you hit 40. That reminds me of two elderly gentlemen who were playing cards. Max, the older gentleman, was having a hard time remembering what cards were what, and usually needed help from his wife.

At the end of the game Ed said to Max, “You did very good tonight and didn’t need any help. What happened?”

Max replied, “Ever since my wife sent me to memory school, I haven’t had any problems at all.”

“Memory school? What memory school?”

Max furrowed his brow for a minute and then asked Ed, “Oh, what’s that flower that’s red with thorns? It’s a really pretty flower…”

“A rose?”

Max then said, “Yeah, that’s it!” He turned to his wife and mumbled, “Hey, Rose! What’s the name of that memory school you sent me to?”

Immutability

As humans, we are always changing. Ever since the fall of Adam, when sin was introduced, change has been part of life. The moment we are born, we begin to age. We grow, develop, and then deteriorate ­ and our memory is one of the first things to go.

Our only hope in life is this: God never changes. He is the one constant we can count on while everything around us radically changes.

Our topic today, in theological terms, is referred to as the immutability of God. Something is mutable if it is subject to change in any degree. To be immutable means to be unchanging and unchangeable.

Here’s a working definition: “God does not, and cannot, change in His basic character.” Nothing that God has ever said about Himself will be modified; nothing the inspired prophets and apostles have said about Him will be rescinded. His immutability guarantees this.

Here’s another definition that captures the depth and the beauty of God’s unchanging character: “All that God is, He has always been; and all that He has been, and is, He will ever be.”

You can also use the word “always” to express this truth about God. God is always wise, always sovereign, always faithful, always just, always holy and always loving. Whatever God is, He always is. There are no “sometimes” attributes of God. All of His attributes are “always” attributes. He always is what He is.


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