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Summary: This is a psalm of the Messiah; the words are applied to the Lord Jesus in Hebrews 10:5—“Therefore, when He came into the world, He said: “Sacrifice and offering You did not desire, but a body You have prepared for Me.”

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February 25, 2015

Tom Lowe

Title: PSALM 40: PAST TRIUMPHS AND PRESENT TROUBLES (Part 3)

A psalm of David.

Part 1 David’s Conviction (verses 1-5)

Part 2 David’s Consecration (verses 6-8)

Part 3 David’s Confession (verses 9-10)

Part 4 David’s Contrition (verses 11-13)

Part 5 David’s Consolation (verses 14-17)

Psalm 40 (KJV)

Part 3 David’s Confession

9 I have preached righteousness in the great congregation: lo, I have not refrained my lips, O Lord, thou knowest.

10 I have not hid thy righteousness within my heart; I have declared thy faithfulness and thy salvation: I have not concealed thy lovingkindness and thy truth from the great congregation.

Introduction to Part 3

This is a psalm of the Messiah; the words are applied to the Lord Jesus in Hebrews 10:5—“Therefore, when He came into the world, He said: “Sacrifice and offering You did not desire, but a body You have prepared for Me.” The entire psalm can be applied to the Lord Jesus—first to His resurrection and then to his sufferings on the cross. These verses describe His earthly ministry. He had proclaimed the good news of deliverance in the great congregation, that is, to the house (nation) of Israel. He had not held back anything that God had given Him to declare. He had not passed over the great truths of God’s saving help, enduring faithfulness, or steadfast love.

Commentary

9 I have preached righteousness in the great congregation: lo, I have not refrained my lips, O Lord, thou knowest.

10a I have not hid thy righteousness within my heart.

The psalmist feels both the obligation and the impulse to testify before the congregation of the Lord’s worshippers with regard to what he experienced from the righteousness, faithfulness, and saving power of God. He reveals the transparent nature of his own heart as he makes this pronouncement and emphasizes the fact that he has now fulfilled his obligation to tell the story in the presence of the great congregation of worshippers. The righteousness of God is at the heart of the Bible’s revelation concerning God. In Paul’s great doctrinal thesis, the Epistle to the Romans, he uses the word righteousness no less than 66 times. The great Biblical doctrines of sin, salvation, sanctification, and service (as summarized in this Epistle) all hinge on the fact that God is righteous—that is, that God always does what is right.

David preached the righteous majesty of God. He had seen it at work during the perilous years when he fled as a fugitive from Saul, holding onto the promise of God that the throne would be his and steadfastly refusing to do anything to take the law into his own hands. He had seen it at work during the prosperous years when he first ascended to the throne and saw all his foes go down before him like corn before the scythe. He had seen that righteous majesty at work in the punitive years after his sin with Bathsheba, when God righteously raised up first his own kinsmen and then his entire kingdom against him as punishment for his wickedness. He would see it at work yet again in the peaceful years when, his throne finally restored, he would at last be able to harness all national resources for the building of the temple.


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