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Summary: Resting in the Lord

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Resting in the Lord

Psalm 3:1-2, “1

O LORD, I have so many enemies;

so many are against me.

2

So many are saying,

"God will never rescue him!"[1]

Interlude”

2 Samuel 15

12While he was offering the sacrifices, he sent for Ahithophel, one of David’s counselors who lived in Giloh. Soon many others also joined Absalom, and the conspiracy gained momentum.

Psalm 69

4

Those who hate me without cause

are more numerous than the hairs on my head.

These enemies who seek to destroy me

are doing so without cause.

They attack me with lies,

demanding that I give back what I didn’t steal.

Psalm 22

7

Everyone who sees me mocks me.

They sneer and shake their heads, saying,

8

"Is this the one who relies on the LORD?

Then let the LORD save him!

If the LORD loves him so much,

let the LORD rescue him!"

Psalm 71

11

They say, "God has abandoned him.

Let’s go and get him,

for there is no one to help him now."

King David here must have felt in the minority despite him being the King over Israel at this time. There may have been as many as 10,000 soldiers surrounding him at this time (3:6). Not only did David’s enemies view life differently than himself, but they sought also to harm him. While King David could have trusted his army to do what it would, King David put his trust and hope in the Lord and His mercy (3:4); therefore he was at peace with whatever situations came his way and whatever outcome occurred, knowing that God’s great purposes would prevail. We can overcome fear by trusting God for his protection in our darkest hour. David here is not seen as sitting on his throne but running for his life from his rebellious son; Absalom, and a host of traitors. When circumstances go against us; it is tempting to think that God is also against us. But David reminds us that the opposite is true. When everything seems to go against us, God is still for us. If circumstance has turned against you, don’t blame God-seek His face! The word interlude is a translation of the Hebrew word Selah which occurs 71 times in Psalms and three times in Habakkuk (3:3, 9,13). Its precise meaning is not known; however, we think that it could mean three things. First it could mean it was a musical direction to the singers and orchestra to play forte or crescendo. It was a signal to lit up the hands or voice in worship, or to the priest to give a benediction. It was a phrase like Amen, meaning so be it, or Hallelujah meaning, praise the Lord.

Psalm 3:3-4, “3

But you, O LORD, are a shield around me,

my glory, and the one who lifts my head high.

4

I cried out to the LORD,

Interlude

and he answered me from his holy mountain.”

Psalm 5

12

For you bless the godly, O LORD,

surrounding them with your shield of love.

Psalm 27

5

For he will conceal me there when troubles come;

he will hide me in his sanctuary.

He will place me out of reach on a high rock.

6

Then I will hold my head high,

above my enemies who surround me.

At his Tabernacle I will offer sacrifices with shouts of joy,

singing and praising the LORD with music.

Psalm 28

7

The LORD is my strength, my shield from every danger.


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