Sermons

Summary: The coming of Isaac into their home brought both joy and sorrow to Abraham and Sarah. As you look at the persons involved in this important event, you can learn some valuable lessons about basic Christian doctrine and how to live the Christian life.

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May 19, 2014

Preaching Through Genesis

By: Tom Lowe

The Birth of Isaac. Gen. 21:1-7.

Genesis 21:1-7 (KJV)

1 And the LORD visited Sarah as he had said, and the LORD did unto Sarah as he had spoken.

2 For Sarah conceived, and bare Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him.

3 And Abraham called the name of his son that was born unto him, whom Sarah bare to him, Isaac.

4 And Abraham circumcised his son Isaac being eight days old, as God had commanded him.

5 And Abraham was an hundred years old, when his son Isaac was born unto him.

6 And Sarah said, God hath made me to laugh, so that all that hear will laugh with me.

7 And she said, Who would have said unto Abraham, that Sarah should have given children suck? for I have born him a son in his old age.

Introduction

Someone has said, “The Christian life is a land of hills and valleys.” Solomon expressed the same idea when he wrote in Ecclesiastics 3:4 that “[there is] a time to weep, and a time to laugh.” Heaven is a place of unending joy; hell is a place of unending suffering; but while we are here on earth, we must expect both joy and sorrow, laughter and tears. You cannot have hills without valleys.

The coming of Isaac into their home brought both joy and sorrow to Abraham and Sarah. As you look at the persons involved in this important event, you can learn some valuable lessons about basic Christian doctrine and how to live the Christian life.

Message

1 And the LORD visited Sarah as he had said, and the LORD did unto Sarah as he had spoken.

2 For Sarah conceived, and bare Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him.

Few in the Old Testament were brought into the world with the expectations that accompanied the birth of Isaac. It was not due to any personal eminence that would be thrust upon him, such as would come to one born into a royal family, but because in his birth he was a type of Christ; that seed that the Holy God had promised, and holy men had for so long anticipated. In this account we observe the fulfillment of that promise in the conception and birth of Isaac. He was born according to the promise, and at the time He told Abraham and Sarah that it would happen. God is always on time, though His help may not come when we expect it, but it will certainly come at the time which He sets, and that is the best time.

You will notice that there is a very striking similarity between the birth of Isaac and the birth of Christ. I believe that the birth of Isaac was given to us to set before mankind this great truth before Christ came. Isaac was born at the set time God had promised, and Paul says, “But when the time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under law” (Gal. 4:4).

Sarah had born the burden of childlessness for many years, a heavy burden indeed in that culture and at that time. People must have smiled when they learned that her husband’s name was Abraham, “father of a multitude.” He was the father of one son, Ishmael, but that was far from a multitude; and Sarah had never given birth. But now all of her reproach was ended, and they were rejoicing in the arrival of their son.


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