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Summary: So many people when they think of judgment they believe that it is a negative thing, but it is all about the outcome. If you are being judged or assessed on your performance and then rewarded for your effort it is a good thing, when you know you did your very best.

JUDGMENT! There are a number of judgements found in the Bible.

So many people when they think of judgment they believe that it is a negative thing, but it is all about the outcome. If you are being judged or assessed on your performance and then rewarded for your effort it is a good thing, when you know you did your very best. When we go before the throne of God and through His judgment, and He adjudicates a finding of ‘well done my good and faithful servant’ you will then rejoice. The only time judgment is a negative thing is when you know you have not met the appropriate expectations.

What is judgement - the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions - (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it - the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event on the evidence presented.

Before we even get into investigating the types of Judgments we find in the world around us and what our part is in addressing these issues we need to look at the whole root of where the judgement of others comes from. Do you realise that the origin of Judgment in the world originates from the original sin!

Jesus addressed this matter of original sin in Mark chapter eleven verse thirteen; the story is also found in Matthew twenty-one verse eighteen. We only know it as ‘the cursing of the fig tree’, but in this parable, Jesus is addressing the original sin and also the lack of spiritual fruit coming out of the religious establishment of the day in Israel.

Mark 11:12-14, NKJV

The Fig Tree Withered

Now the next day, when they had come out from Bethany, He was hungry. 13 And seeing from afar a fig tree having leaves, He went to see if perhaps He would find something on it. When He came to it, He found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs. 14 In response Jesus said to it, “Let no one eat fruit from you ever again.”

And His disciples heard it.

Just reading this scripture about the fig tree by its self makes no sense – why? This incident on the surface seems very baffling as to why the Messiah should curse a defenceless fig tree for having leaves but no fruit. However, when you understand the association of the fig with Judah or Judea, as it was then known, the meaning becomes entirely clear.

We should ask a few question like;

• Does the parable of the fig tree have a deeper significants?

• Why did He curse the fig tree?

• Why is this type of behaviour ok?

• Why would you want to exemplify this kind of behaviour as a Christian, ‘cursing a fig tree for not having fruit when it isn't the time for figs?’

• Why does He then focus on a mountain? Was He just picking on the little fig tree, or was He teaching His disciples a lesson? If so what was the lesson?

• Where was He standing when He made this declaration? He was in Jerusalem standing in front of ‘The Temple Mount – Mount Maria’. My Bible tells me in verse twenty that this was ‘The Lesson of the Withered Fig Tree.’

Is He saying, if you're hungry, and you can't find food curse the fig tree or if there is a mountain in your way through it into the sea? Or are these metaphors for something?

When you read stories like this one, that make no sense, you need to ask what is actually being said, what is the contextual and historical significants, we need to learn to dig deeper.

He then goes on to say in Mark chapter eleven verse twenty three “For assuredly, I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be removed and be cast into the sea,’ and does not doubt in his heart, but believes that those things he says will be done, he will have whatever he says.” Let me ask you a question. What was the mountain He was referring to?

The mountain He was referring to was the Religious establishments of the day.

Do you realise that this whole event in Mark eleven is just after Palm Sunday and six days before His coming crucifixion? Jesus had gone into Jerusalem and also the temple. The Bible tells us – “So when He had looked around at all things, as the hour was already late, He went out to Bethany with the twelve.” So He leaves the temple and goes to Bethany to sleep, He must have been upset with what He had seen in the temple because the next day he goes back to the temple and has this object lesson about the fig tree on the way.

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