Improve your sermon prep with our brand new study tools! Learn all about them here.
Sermons

Summary: The story provides a good window through which to view the other events of that day AND this day. It sheds some important light for anyone still trying to figure out what to do with Jesus. The story divides into three acts. Each is about an invitation

  Study Tools

Day by Day with Jesus/Last Week Series

The Invitation

Matthew 22:1-14

Dr. Roger W. Thomas, Preaching Minister

First Christian Church, Vandalia, MO

“For many are invited but few are chosen!” That’s the punch line to Jesus’ parable. Parables aren’t just cute little stories that illustrate a spiritual lesson. Sometimes that’s the case. But other times, Jesus’ parables are more like riddles. They raise more questions than they answer. That may be the case with this one!

We are in the middle of a series of messages leading up to Easter. We are exploring Jesus’ last week. These seven days changed the world. Understanding them can change your life as well.

On Sunday, the crowds cheered Jesus like a king. He wept because he knew what was going to happen—to them. On Monday the tears turn to fire. He curses a barren fig tree and drives the money-changers from the temple. Both events were object lessons of judgment to come. The events of Sunday and Monday were not lost on Jesus’ rivals. Mark’s gospel records that after the temple affair, “The chief priests and the teachers of the law… began looking for a way to kill him, for they feared him, because the whole crowd was amazed at his teaching” (11:18). Tuesday turns into a day of challenge.

Our text comes in the middle of that last Tuesday. As with many of Jesus’ parables, there is more to the story than meets the eye. The story provides a good window through which to view the other events of that day AND this day. It sheds some important light for anyone still trying to figure out what to do with Jesus. The story divides into three acts. Each is about an invitation. In the first, the invitation is offered. In the second, it rejected. In the third, it is neglected.

Act I: the invitation is offered. Ancient wedding customs were much different than the modern version. But they had one thing in common. A wedding was a big, festive event. The concluding wedding feast could last for days. Friends and family came from far and wide. This was the king’s son. To be invited was a big deal. People might boast about being there for years.

Jesus says, “this is what the kingdom of heaven is like.” The Bible often uses the image of a great banquet as a picture of heaven. Isaiah 25 pictures the glorious future of the redeemed like this, “On this mountain the Lord Almighty will prepare a feast of rich food for all peoples, a banquet of aged wine—the best of meats and the finest of wines” (5-6). The final chapters of the Bible picture what Scriptures terms “the wedding feast of the lamb. “Blessed are those who are invited to the wedding supper of the Lamb” (Rev 19:9).

Here’s the point. Take the happiest, most joyful experiences on earth you can think of. Imagine the best party or banquet you have ever attended, or the finest food you have ever eaten. God has something even better planned. The Bible says, “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no man has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him (1 Cor 2:9). Clearly those who picture heaven as a dull and boring place don’t have clue!


Browse All Media

Related Media


A God-Man Down
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
All About Jesus
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Behold Your King
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion