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Summary: The thought of a public examination before the Judgment bar of our Lord should be incentive enough to awaken even the most slumbering saint of God.

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The thought of a public examination before the Judgment bar of our Lord should be incentive enough to awaken even the most slumbering saint of God. Yet few, if any, ever give it a second thought. Paul declared, "So then every one of us shall give account of himself to God" (Rom. 14:12). Perhaps if the doctrine of judgment and reward were expounded more from our pulpits there would be more attention given to living a life of holiness and obedience. Think of it. How will you stand in that day? Will you approach Him with confidence or will you stand before Him red-faced and embarrassed over a life of waste and neglect? It is something that we as Christians will all have to do. Are you ready to appear before the judgment seat? And if you say that you are, perhaps you are speaking without the necessary contemplation of the task that lies before you. Yes, the judgment seat will be a most solemn occasion for many in that great day.

Many are of the opinion that there will be one general resurrection and judgment, but the Scriptures speak of as many as seven judgments that span from the cross of Christ to the beginning of the eternal state. These include: (1) the judgment of Christ at the cross (John 12:31); (2) of the believer himself (1 Cor. 11:31-32); (3) of the believer’s works (2 Cor. 5:10); (4) of the nations (Matt. 25:31-46); (5) of Israel (Ezek. 20:33-44); (6) of the fallen angels (1 Cor. 6:3; 2 Pet. 2:4; Jude 6); and (7) of the unsaved at the great white throne (Rev. 20:11-15).

Paul declares in 2 Corinthians 5:10: "For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad." The basis of this judgment will be the believer’s works. Concerning the believer’s sins, Chafer states: "Although his sins have been judged at the cross and will not be brought up again, at the judgment seat of Christ his works or service will be judged." Therefore, we see that in the life of the believer there is a threefold judgment: (1) as a sinner, his judgment at the cross is past (Rom. 8:1); (2) as a son, the believer must judge himself and confess his sins, or else expect chastisement (1 Cor. 11:31-32; Heb. 12:7); and (3) as a servant, a future judgment awaits the believer at the judgment seat of Christ (2 Cor. 5:10; 1 Cor. 3:9-15; Rom. 14:10).

According to Thayer, the judgment seat or bema was "a raised place mounted by steps; a platform, tribune: used of the official seat of a judge, Mt. xxvii. 19; Jn. Xix. 13; Acts xvii. 12, 16..." The bema was also used to denote a raised stand or platform in Grecian games to award the winning contestants. For many, it will be a day of reward and honor; yet there will be those present who will also suffer loss (2 John 8). John declares, "And now, little children, abide in him; that, when he shall appear, we may have confidence, and not be ashamed before him at his coming" (1 John 2:28).

When will this future judgment of the believer take place? Paul told the Corinthian believers: "Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts; and then shall every man have praise of God" (1 Cor. 4:5; cf. 1 Jn. 2:28; 2 Tim. 4:8; Rev. 22:12). Therefore, the judgment seat of Christ will take place at the rapture of the church, when we "meet the Lord in the air" (1 Thess. 4:17), prior to returning to the "heavenlies."


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