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Summary: The praise and worship part of our Christian life is of the utmost importance because it helps us develop a deeper relationship with God, and in the words we find the hope, joy, and comfort that we all seek.

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Today I want us to analyze a very important aspect of our Christian life that is oftentimes overlooked, or not given too much attention to. I say that it is something that is oftentimes overlooked or not paid attention to because the majority of all believers only take care of this aspect of their life once per week, or simply don’t take care at all. The reason why many do not take care of this aspect of their life is because of the attitude they have developed in their hearts. As many say, the attitude you develop is 99% of the battle. In all reality there is a great truth in this way of thinking, I say this because our attitude or disposition in the majority of cases can be the difference between having a good day, or a miserable day. Our attitude or disposition about things can be the difference between having a good marriage and one full of pain and suffering. Our attitude or disposition can be the difference between living a happy and harmonious life in our home, and a life filled with misery and suffering, even though we might be surrounded by those who love us. A negative attitude will completely stop us, or make us indifferent about this aspect of our Christian life. What aspect of our life have I been talking about? I am speaking about our worship life. This is an aspect that many pay very little attention to, but just because it may be ignored or undervalued, it does not mean that it is unimportant. The praise and worship part of our Christian life is of the utmost importance because it helps us develop a deeper relationship with God, and in the words we find the hope, joy, and comfort that we all seek. This is why today we will be studying about this important aspect of our Christian life. With this in mind, let’s now examine one of the psalms.

Psalms 27:1-6 - The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? 2When the wicked came against me. To eat up my flesh, my enemies and foes, they stumbled and fell. 3Though an army may encamp against me, My heart shall not fear; though war may rise against me, in this I will be confident. 4One thing I have desired of the LORD, That will I seek: That I may dwell in the house of the LORD, all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to inquire in His temple. 5For in the time of trouble He shall hide me in His pavilion; in the secret place of His tabernacle; He shall hide me; He shall set me high upon a rock. 6And now my head shall be lifted up above my enemies all around me; therefore I will offer sacrifices of joy in His tabernacle; I will sing, yes, I will sing praises to the LORD.

This psalm was written by King David, someone who had ample experience regarding the conflicts and dangers that being an anointed person of God could produce. I say this because when we take the time to study the bible, we quickly find that David’s life was in danger from the moment he defeated Goliath in the battle field. This is something that is very well reflected in 1 Samuel 18:8-9 when we read “Then Saul was very angry, and the saying displeased him; and he said, “They have ascribed to David ten thousands, and to me they have ascribed only thousands. Now what more can he have but the kingdom?” 9So Saul eyed David from that day forward.” After his victory over Goliath, his fame and reputation grew in such a way, that the people loved him more than the king. Needless to say that this made the king furious; this is why the king attempted to kill David on more than one occasion. Because these attempts were made on his life, David was forced to flee and hide to save his life on more than one occasion. This is something that is very well reflected in 1 Samuel 19:11-12 when we read “Saul also sent messengers to David’s house to watch him and to kill him in the morning. And Michal, David’s wife, told him, saying, “If you do not save your life tonight, tomorrow you will be killed.” 12So Michal let David down through a window. And he went and fled and escaped.” From this moment on, the king’s persecution was without ceasing. This persecution eventually forced David to flee the country in order to save his life, an action that is very well reflected in 1 Samuel 27:1 when we read “And David said in his heart, “Now I shall perish someday by the hand of Saul. There is nothing better for me than that I should speedily escape to the land of the Philistines; and Saul will despair of me, to seek me anymore in any part of Israel. So I shall escape out of his hand.” But David’s hardships don’t stop here because after having endured all of this, and after assuming his rightful position as king, his own son made him flee to save his life. This is something that is clearly documented in 2 Samuel 15:14 when we read “So David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, “Arise, and let us flee, or we shall not escape from Absalom. Make haste to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly and bring disaster upon us, and strike the city with the edge of the sword.”


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