Sermons

Summary: The power that our words carry.

  Study Tools

The Power of our Words.

For the LORD is good; his mercy is everlasting; and his truth endureth to all generations. Psalms 100:5

Here is the greatest benefit of walking and living in truth. According to the scriptures, being truthful and forgiving carries benefits. Truth and forgiveness brings with it four benefits; namely; favor with God, favor with men, good understanding with God, and good understanding with men. Proverbs 3:3-4 says, “Let not mercy and truth forsake thee: bind them about thy neck; write them upon the table of thine heart: 4So shalt thou find favour and good understanding in the sight of God and man.” Being honest, or better truthful, and having a forgiving spirit benefits us spiritually, physically, financially, and even emotionally. By simply being truthful with others and ourselves puts us in a position of favor with God and man. A little bit of honesty goes a long way with God. Favor with God, means being in God’s grace, His kindness, and His goodness. Isn’t that what David was referring to in the 23rd Psalms when he said, “Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.”

How important are our words? Every idle word that we speak in our lifetime, we must give an account of it. St. Matthew 12:36-37 says, “But I say unto you, That every idle word that men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment. 37For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.”

To get a complete understanding we need to define what “idle” means. The word “idle” means inactive, unemployed, barren, useless, lazy, and slow. That means every word that we speak that is unproductive, unfruitful, and unspiritual, we must give an account of it. Does that mean every sarcastic comment, every racial joke, every unfounded criticism, and every profanity? It certainly does mean just that. I can see why Jesus said in his sermon on the mount in St. Matthew 5:37, “But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil.”

Our words are powerful because something or someone gives them power. Here’s an example to get a better understanding of the concept of the power behind our words. Imagine a steam locomotive train going full speed down the tracks, with all that heavy metal, and train parts moving with incredible speed. Now imagine there was an obstacle standing right on the tracks, and the conductor didn’t switch tracks. With the weight and speed of the train, the force would literally destroy the obstacle. Even though the train physically destroyed the obstacle, it was the steam that powered the train to do the damage, and the conductor who drove the train into the obstacle. Now imagine that same train was you and your words, and you are barreling down the tracks of life at full speed ahead. There is an obstacle in your way called your best friend, your husband, your wife, your children, your neighbor, or anyone you choose. The question is who is putting the power in your steam engine, and whose conducting the train? No wonder the psalmist says in Psalms 51:6, “Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom.”


Browse All Media

Related Media


Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion