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Summary: 5th message in James series. james’ warning against partiality or favoritism. We are subject to a higher law.

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A brilliant medical doctor discovered the use of blood plasma that resulted in saving thousands of lives in World War II, Korea, and the Vietnam War. At Pearl Harbor, for example, 96% of those who received plasma, survived. After World War II Charles Drew was named director of the National Blood Bank Program, and devoted himself to teaching doctors at Howard University Medical School.

On April 1, 1950, while driving some young doctors to a conference he was involved in an automobile accident in Burlington, N.C. He was rushed to a hospital where his life could have been saved by plasma. But Dr. Drew was denied admission to the hospital because his skin was black. He died on the way to another hospital 26 miles away.

The blot of racial bias stains the pages of our national history. Unfortunately, church history is stained with prejudice also. The bigotry has too often been expressed because of race, but it takes other forms as well. There is the subtle prejudice of younger people toward the elderly. Often adults are prejudiced toward teens. Doctrinal divisions over questions not fundamental to the faith have created intolerance. Charismania on one hand and charisphobia on the other have prejudiced dear Christians against one another.

Even musical preferences are often treated not as mere differences of opinion but as means of testing genuine faith. (If you sing this style or type of music you’re OK, the other style and you’re a heretic). Warren Wiersbe says, “Most church members consider themselves experts in the area of music, and they do not hesitate to tell the pastor or the minister of music exactly which music is right and which is wrong. Of course, ‘what is right’ is music they personally enjoy; ‘what is wrong’ is music they do not enjoy. It is as simple as that” [Warren Wiersbe, Real Worship (Nashville: Nelson Books, 1986), 137]. One lady couldn’t stand the music that blared from the next apartment. One day she yelled, “If you don’t turn that stereo down, I’ll go insane!” “Too late,” came the reply, “I turned it off an hour ago.”

We all have our personal preferences from the people we’d like to associate with, to the music we like to hear. But James sounds a warning concerning partiality as chapter 2 begins, “My brothers, as believers in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ, don’t show favoritism” (v. 1).

I. THE PROBLEM OF PARTIALITY v. 1

The word translated “favoritism” comes from two words—”to receive” and “face.” “To receive by face” is to evaluate a person on the basis of surface characteristics. James warns, “Don’t just look at a person’s face, or outward appearance. Don’t be biased in your judgment by clothing, wealth, or position!”

The reason is simple: such favoritism obviously runs counter to the character of Christ. Though He was “glorious” He humbled Himself to identify with the poor and the oppressed to whom He promised the kingdom. His mission was announced at the beginning of His ministry: “The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed...” (Luke 4:18). Prejudice based on physical appearance, social status or race is inconsistent with faith in the One who came to break down the barriers of nationality, race, sexism and religion.


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Talk about it...

David Thompson

commented on Aug 15, 2007

This was a nice sermon. However, the illustration regarding Dr. Charles Drew being discriminated against because of his race is incorrect. His widow claimed that all efforts were expended by the medical staff at the hospital in an effort to save his life. This truth was also attested to by other witnesses, including Dr. John Ford, another Afro-American physician, who was traveling with Dr. Drew at the time of the accident.

James Whitmore

commented on Feb 4, 2013

I thought you had some very good thoughts in this sermon. However, I can find no evidence to back up the story of Charlotte Elliott. Seems she was not a vocalist as the illustration claims.

Brian Comeaux

commented on Apr 20, 2015

"Just As I Am" is a well-known hymn, written by Charlotte Elliott in 1835,

Donald Shaffer

commented on Aug 9, 2014

Glad to see people checking facts.

Brian Comeaux

commented on Apr 20, 2015

"Just As I Am" is a well-known hymn, written by Charlotte Elliott in 1835, yes he checked his facts

Julie Smith

commented on Sep 23, 2015

While I enjoyed reading the sermon the story about Charlotte Elliott didn't sound right to me, so I looked her up in Companion to the United Methodist Hymnal and the story is completely different than the one used as illustration in the sermon. The story outlined in the work cited above is compelling on its own.

Julie Smith

commented on Sep 23, 2015

While I enjoyed reading the sermon the story about Charlotte Elliott didn't sound right to me, so I looked her up in Companion to the United Methodist Hymnal and the story is completely different than the one used as illustration in the sermon. The story outlined in the work cited above is compelling on its own.

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