Sermons

Summary: Learning to trust God completely

For the past 2 months, the song “The struggle is over” has resonated in my spirit. For the past 6 weeks, it has been the song of altar call as you petition God for an answer. This morning, Brother Melvin performed a praise dance to the same song that reveals the struggle is over. I petitioned God to reveal to me the significance of this song and why it has weighed in my spirit for so long. He had me to begin reflecting on the various circumstances. World wide, unjust wars begun under false allegations to vindicate a long standing feud, when there is a genocide occurring in a poor nation killing hundreds of thousands and nothing is said. In a nation that has found a way to reinstate slavery through the judicial system. By imprisoning black men and boys for a gram of cocaine, but allowing those who traffic in the coke into the streets where these boys and men live to pump the poison in with minimal repercussions. A denomination that is reeling from allegations of sexual misconduct of those who preach to persuade people that holiness is right. In a state where baby boy establishes programs based on a whim, and removed viable programs without thought or concern that it will affect. In a city school system where separate but equal has been outlawed but has not been taken out of practice. In a church house where people struggle with day-to-day problems that seem larger than life and at times our personal situation seems hopeless and we feel helpless. Is it no wonder why we need a word to empower us to believe, that the struggle is over?

In this passage, we find Isaiah in a season of praise – rejoicing in the knowledge of who is actually in charge, and why our struggles are not actually our struggles. Because of the God’s grace and power, we will be victors. It is the song that is sung throughout the Scriptures. This is the assurance that we have from God himself. Our lives will not be lived in vain. Those who berate, belittle, and batter God’s people will be exposed and his beloved children, his saints of light, will receive vindication and salvation from the Father they love.

In fact, the songwriter is really embracing the words of Isaiah. He states, wherever you are, whatever you’ve been going through, God said, the struggle is over for you. You’ve been in this thing long enough. And your mountainside has been rough. The struggle is over for you. He is not saying that there will be not hard times or difficulties, because if that were the case, it couldn’t be over if it never started. He is simply reminding us that the struggle is not bigger then God… and God is still in control… so it isn’t our struggle --- so it is over.

2 Chronicles 20:14-15 we find Jehosaphat receives a word

14 Then the Spirit of the LORD came upon Jahaziel the son of Zechariah, the son of Benaiah, the son of Jeiel, the son of Mattaniah, a Levite of the sons of Asaph, in the midst of the assembly. 15 And he said, “Listen, all you of Judah and you inhabitants of Jerusalem, and you, King Jehosaphat! Thus says the LORD to you: ‘Do not be afraid nor dismayed because of this great multitude, for the battle is not yours, but God’s.

If you read the entire chapter, you will find that Jehoshaphat.is in a predicament. There are rumors that a massive army will attack his people. Jehoshaphat calls his people into a season of fasting and praying. Turning the struggle over (the struggle is over) to God and waiting for a word of instruction. God not only came with instruction, He came with assurance. We can’t fix any problem, but God will use us to rectify and restore. If we stand still and wait for instruction and than act after we receive instruction, God will heal and restore communities, regions, nations, and yes even affairs that affect the world. But if we are too petrified to believe that God can change our household messes, how can we trust Him enough to instruct and use us in the bigger scope of things. But if we embrace that no weapon formed against us, and if we believe the battle is not ours, it’s the Lords – we can actually celebrate and say the struggle over.

Psalms 27:1-5

The Lord is my light and the One Who saves me. Whom should I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life. Of whom should I be afraid?

2 When sinful men, and all who hated me, came against me to destroy my flesh, they tripped and fell.

3 Even if an army gathers against me, my heart will not be afraid. Even if war rises against me, I will be sure of you.

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