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Summary: The remainder of chapter 16 concerns Paul’s work in Philippi. It falls into four separate scenes. Verses 11-15 relates the group’s (Paul, Silas, Mark, and Timothy) journey to Philippi and the conversation of a prominent woman named Lydia. Verses 16....

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January 28, 2015

By: Tom Lowe

Title: The Work in Philippi (16:11-40)

Part 1: Founding a Church with Lydia (16:11-15; KJV)

11 Therefore loosing from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis;

12 And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony: and we were in that city abiding certain days.

13 And on the sabbath we went out of the city by a river side, where prayer was wont to be made; and we sat down, and spake unto the women which resorted thither.

14 And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city of Thyatira, which worshipped God, heard us: whose heart the Lord opened, that she attended unto the things which were spoken of Paul.

15 And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us.

Introduction

The remainder of chapter 16 concerns Paul’s work in Philippi. It falls into four separate scenes. Verses 11-15 relates the group’s (Paul, Silas, Mark, and Timothy) journey to Philippi and the conversation of a prominent woman named Lydia. Verses 16-24 deal with the healing of a possessed servant girl and its unfortunate result. Verses 25-34 tell of the conversion of the Philippian Jailer. Verses 35-40 deals with the final encounter of Paul the Roman citizen with the city magistrates.

Commentary

11 Therefore loosing from Troas, we came with a straight course to Samothracia, and the next day to Neapolis;

Verses 11-12 relates the journey from Troas to Philippi. The weather must have been good and the winds favorable because their ship cited Samothrace(an island located off the Thracian coast on a direct line between Troas and Neapolis[1].) the first day. Samothrace was a mountainous island with a peek rising 5,000 feet above sea level. It was an unmistakable point of interest midway between Troas and Neapolis, the port of Philippi. The Island had been, from ancient times, the seat of the Cabiri cult. It would need evangelizing, of course, but Paul’s sites were now set on the mainland of Europe. The island was soon left far behind, and the next day they arrived at Neapolis (From Troas to Neapolis was a distance of about 150 miles.) and Paul’s feet stood at last upon European soil[2]. Luke may have seen this good crossing as a sign of God’s approval. In Acts 20:6 the voyage from Philippi to Troas took considerably longer—five days in all, apparently because of contrary winds and a strong current in the opposite direction.

12 And from thence to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony: and we were in that city abiding certain days.

The group would have taken the “Via Egnatia” (also called the “Ignatian Way”)—a Roman road that linked the Aegean Sea with the Adriatic Sea—the ten miles or so to Philippi. This route was the main east–west highway through Macedonia, beginning at Dyrrhachium on the Adriatic coast, traveling through Thessalonica, Amphipolis, and Philippi and terminating at Neapolis. Paul often traveled this road. Again, Paul did not linger at Neapolis. He had his eyes on bigger fields.


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