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Summary: Continuing with the theme of faith, Lewis creates a number of characters that model different kinds of faith.

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Dear Church Leader,

As a life-long C.S. Lewis fan, and a pastor for twenty-five years, I am excited not only about the wholesome entertainment value of the second film in the Chronicles of Narnia series, but also about the tool the film can be for churches and ministries. I’ve been told that the awareness level of Prince Caspian is running over 95%, which means that over 9 out of 10 people you run into, whether in church, or on the street, know about the movie. What an incredible opportunity to use something as much fun as a great film to enhance your ministry!

I have been asked to point out several of the most relevant spiritual themes in the film that might be used for messages, discussions, small group interaction, or other creative ideas. Here is the third of four:

Message Three: Three Kinds of "People."

Continuing with the theme of faith, Lewis creates a number of characters that model different kinds of faith. Three prominent characters that can be used to teach the lesson of faith through the film are Trumpkin, Trufflehunter, and Nikabrk. They are models of three kinds of people that we can find everyday in almost every situation and circumstance. Trumpkin the Dwarf is the resident doubter. He doesn’t know what to do with the old stories. At first, he doesn’t know what to do with the "kings and queens of old" who show up at the summoning of Susan’s horn, but are children. Trumpkin "follows the facts." His faith begins to grow. He eventually comes to full faith when he meets Aslan. This event takes place earlier in the book than in the film, but he is a great character. Many people in the world are a great deal like Trumpkin.

Nikabrik the Dwarf is the hard-core unbeliever. If he had his way, they would have put Caspian to death when he, Trumpkin, and Trufflehunter first rescued him. Nikabrik is also like a great many people in the world today. He doesn’t believe in Aslan, but he does believe in the power of the supernatural. When the Pevensies and Caspian face defeat, he suggests using the power that kept Aslan at bay for a hundred years; i.e., the power of witchcraft.

At the opposite side of the faith spectrum we find Trufflehunter the Badger. He is a true believer. He has complete faith that Aslan will show up and win the day. In the end, he is the one who is correct. His faith doesn’t waver, and he becomes a source of encouragement and motivation when things look bleak. The three characters can be a great illustration of faith in the modern world.


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