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Summary: Psalm 19 explains that creation and the Bible teach us important lessons about our God and about ourselves.

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In 1980 CNN took to the air for the first time.

First 24-hour news broadcast station.

Now CNN is hard to escape when traveling. It’s constantly on at airports and hotels.

That’s because many people feel out of touch if they haven’t checked in with CNN during the day.

However, I’ve noticed that rarely does what I see on CNN change my life.

In fact if I actually sit down and watch an entire CNN newscast, I feel like I’ve wasted my time.

Today Psalm 19 points us to a better news network. No, not the BBC or CBC, but GNN (God’s News Network). You don’t even need a cable subscription to do this. Today I want to urge you to turn off CNN and tune in GNN. You can do this by looking at God’s creation and by listening to God’s Word. Let’s see what we can learn about God and ourselves when we do these things.

Long before CNN launched the first 24-hour news service, God’s creation: the stars, the sky, flowers, have been broadcasting round the clock. What are they saying? Listen again to our text.

“The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. 2 Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they display knowledge. 3 There is no speech or language where their voice is not heard. 4 Their voice goes out into all the earth, their words to the ends of the world” (Psalm 19:1-4a).

Creation is constantly declaring God’s glory. How? Let’s look at the example that David uses to find out. He speaks about what the sun tells us about God. David wrote:

“In the heavens he has pitched a tent for the sun, 5 which is like a bridegroom coming forth from his pavilion, like a champion rejoicing to run his course. 6 It rises at one end of the heavens and makes its circuit to the other; nothing is hidden from its heat” (Psalm 19:4b-6).

David, personifies the sun and compares him to a great athlete who confidently and eagerly runs its mapped out course every day.

“But the sun doesn’t move around the earth,” some might scoff. “David couldn’t even get the basic science right in this psalm.”

In fairness, David was writing a poem, not a science textbook.

He’s using picture language to describe how great and powerful God must be to have created the sun to heat our world 150 million km away. If you were to travel that distance in a passenger plane, it would take over 21 years!

And yet the sun’s light is so powerful that it can burn your skin.

An area of the sun’s surface the size of a postage stamp shines with the power of 1.5 million candles!

The sun is large – a million earths could fit inside of it. So if the sun was the size of a beach ball, the earth would be the size of a pea.

But the sun is only a medium-sized star. Some stars are 600 times the size of our sun. If the sun were that large, it would swallow up Earth and Mars!

The sun tells us that God is powerful. It also tells us that God is wise.

He placed planet earth just far enough away from the sun so that we don’t roast, and close enough that we don’t freeze.


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