Sermons

Summary: Our Bible lesson is from the twenty-ninth chapter of Genesis, and I would like to place the following words at the beginning: “Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap. For he who sows to his flesh will of th

  Study Tools
  Study Tools

Given at Laurens Memorial Home on 7-23-03

Tom Lowe

6-12-03

Title: We Reap What We Sow

Text: So it came to pass in the morning, that behold, it was Leah. And he said to Laban, “What is this you have done to me? Was it not for Rachel that I served you? Why then have you deceived me?” (Genesis 29:25)

Introduction

Our Bible lesson is from the twenty-ninth chapter of Genesis, and I would like to place the following words at the beginning: “Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap. For he who sows to his flesh will of the flesh reap corruption, but he who sows to the Spirit will of the Spirit reap everlasting life” (Galatians 6:7-8).

Scripture Reading: Genesis 29:16-28 (KJV)

16 And Laban had two daughters: the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel.

17 Leah was tender eyed; but Rachel was beautiful and well favoured.

18 And Jacob loved Rachel; and said, I will serve thee seven years for Rachel thy younger daughter.

19 And Laban said, It is better that I give her to thee, than that I should give her to another man: abide with me.

20 And Jacob served seven years for Rachel; and they seemed unto him but a few days, for the love he had to her.

21 And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.

22 And Laban gathered together all the men of the place, and made a feast.

23 And it came to pass in the evening, that he took Leah his daughter, and brought her to him; and he went in unto her.

24 And Laban gave unto his daughter Leah Zilpah his maid for an handmaid.

25 And it came to pass, that in the morning, behold, it was Leah: and he said to Laban, What is this thou hast done unto me? did not I serve with thee for Rachel? wherefore then hast thou beguiled me?

26 And Laban said, It must not be so done in our country, to give the younger before the firstborn.

27 Fulfil her week, and we will give thee this also for the service which thou shalt serve with me yet seven other years.

28 And Jacob did so, and fulfilled her week: and he gave him Rachel his daughter to wife also.

Probably the title that we ought to give to this chapter is “The Chickens Have Come Home to Roost.” It will become apparent as we read this chapter that Jacob is beginning to reap the harvest of his evil doings.

The verses that I put at the beginning were written primarily for Christians, but it expresses a universal law of God for every age. It is true in any area of life. You sow corn: you reap corn. You sow cotton: you reap cotton. You sow wheat: you reap wheat. Examples of this principle run all the way through the scriptures. For instance, Pharaoh slew the male children of the Hebrews, and in time his son was slain by the death angel. Ahab, through false accusations, had Naboth slain and the dogs licked his blood. God sent His prophet Elijah to Ahab with the message that, as the dogs had licked the blood of Naboth, they would lick the blood of Ahab. And that was literally fulfilled.

You remember that David found this to be an inescapable law which was applicable to his own life. He committed the terrible sins of adultery and murder. God forgave him for his sin. Yet, the chickens came home to roost. He reaped what he had sown. His own daughter was raped and his son slain. Even Paul the apostle felt the weight of this law. He had given his consent to the stoning of Stephen. Later, Paul was taken outside the city of Lystra and was stoned and left for dead.

Jacob is the classic illustration of this inflexible law. Jacob had lived by his wits. He was rather cocky and clever. He had practiced deceit. He would stoop to use shady methods to accomplish his purpose. And he was proud of his cleverness. But he will reap what he has sown.

At the beginning of this chapter, Jacob, who had fled his home because of his treachery against his father and brother has arrived in Haran. He is working for his uncle Laban, who has a very beautiful daughter.

The Bible says--Now Laban had two daughters: the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. (v. 16)

Laban watched this boy and he noticed that he was very much interested in his daughter Rachael, the younger of the two. The next verse tells us why.

Download Sermon With PRO View On One Page With PRO
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion