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Summary: The concept of Biblical inerrancy is an extremely important doctrine because the truth does matter. This issue reflects on the character of God and is foundational to our understanding of everything else the Bible teaches. Here are some reasons why we sho

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Why Inerrancy Matters (2 Tim 2:15-3:17)

The concept of Biblical inerrancy is an extremely important doctrine because the truth does matter. This issue reflects on the character of God and is foundational to our understanding of everything else the Bible teaches. Here are some reasons why we should absolutely believe in Biblical inerrancy:

1. The Bible claims to be perfect. “The words of the Lord are pure words / As silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times” (Psalm 12:6). “The law of the Lord is perfect” (Psalm 19:7). “Every word of God is pure” (Proverbs 30:5). These claims of purity are absolute statements. It’s not “God’s Word is mostly pure” or “scripture is nearly perfect.” The Bible argues for complete perfection, leaving no room for “partial perfection” theories.

2. The Bible stands or falls as a whole. If a major newspaper were routinely discovered to contain errors, it would be quickly discredited. It would make no difference to say, “All the errors are confined to page 3”; for a paper to be reliable in any of its parts, it must be factual throughout. In the same way, if the Bible is inaccurate when it speaks of geology, why should its theology be trusted? It’s either a trustworthy document, or it’s not.

3. The Bible is a reflection of its Author. All books are. The Bible was written by God Himself as He worked through human authors in a process called “inspiration.” Second Timothy 3:16 says, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God” (literally, “is God-breathed”). See also 2 Peter 1:21 and Jeremiah 1:2.

We believe that the God Who created the universe is capable of writing a book. And the God Who is perfect is capable of writing a perfect book. The issue is not simply “Does the Bible have a mistake?” but “Can God make a mistake?” If the Bible contains factual errors, then God is not omniscient and is capable of making errors Himself. If the Bible contains misinformation, then God is not truthful but is a liar. If the Bible contains contradictions, then God is the author of confusion. In other words, if Biblical inerrancy is not true, then God is not God.

4. The Bible judges us, not vice versa. “For the word of God is . . . a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” (Hebrews 4:12). Notice the relationship between “the heart” and “the Word.” The Word examines; the heart is being examined. To discount parts of the Word for any reason is to turn this verse on its head. We become the examiners, and the Word must submit to our “superior insight.” “O man, who art thou that repliest against God?” (Romans 9:20).

5. The Bible’s message must be taken as a whole. It is not a mixture of doctrine that we are free to select from. Many people like the verses that say God loves them, but they dislike the verses that say God will judge sinners. But we simply can’t “pick and choose” what we like about the Bible and throw the rest away. God has said what He’s said, and the Bible presents us a full picture of Who God is. “For ever, O LORD, Thy word is settled in heaven” (Psalm 119:89).

If the Bible is wrong about hell, then who’s to say it’s right about heaven—or about anything else? If the Bible can’t get the details right about creation, then maybe the details about salvation can’t be trusted, either. If the story of Jonah is a myth, then perhaps so is the story of Jesus.

6. The Bible is our only rule for faith and practice. If it is not reliable, then on what do we base our beliefs? Jesus asks for our trust, and that includes trust in what He says in His Word. John 6:68-69 is a beautiful passage. Jesus had just witnessed the departure of many who had claimed to follow Him. Then He turns to the Twelve and asks, “Will ye also go away?” At this, Peter speaks for the rest when he says, “Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.” May we have the same trust in the Lord and in His words of life.

None of what we’ve presented here should be taken as a rejection of true scholarship. Biblical inerrancy does not mean that we are to stop using our minds or accept what the Bible says blindly. We are commanded to study the Word (2 Timothy 2:15), and those who search it out are commended (Acts 17:11). Also, we recognize that there are difficult passages in the Bible, as well as sincere disagreements over interpretation. Our goal is to approach scripture reverently and prayerfully, and when we find something we don’t understand, we pray harder, study more, and—if the answer still eludes us—humbly acknowledge our own limitations in the face of the perfect Word of God.

Recommended Resource: When Critics Ask by Norm Geisler.

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