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Summary: I lived long enough to learn one thing about myself, I don't like change

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I have lived long enough to realize one thing about myself, “I do not like change.”

Every time I look in the mirror, I see change. Every time I open the newspaper I read about the changing times we are living in. When I listen to the news both locally and nationally I am reminded that nothing stays the same. Even some of our most constant routines are changing, just this week the United States Post Office announced, “Effective in August, no Saturday delivery of first class mail.” What? The mail has been delivered six days a week since the day of Abraham Lincoln, another reminder things are changing. Some changes come abrupt and devastating, this past Monday, SunChemical in Worthington announced they are closing and 30 jobs will be lost.

I am reminded of the words of Solomon of old recorded for us in his life’s journal, Ecclesiastes chapter 3.

The chapter opens with, “To everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven:” Then Solomon gives a list, with your permission, I would like to paraphrase the list for you:

A time to be born and a time to die

A time to plant and a time to pull up what is planted

A time to kill and a time to heal

A time to break down and a time to build up

A time to weep and a time to laugh

A time to mourn and a time to dance

A time to cast away stones and a time to gather stones

A time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing (tough love)

A time to gain and a time to lose

A time to keep and a time to have a yard sale (italics my interpretation)

A time to tear and a time to sew

A time to keep silent and a time to speak

A time to love and a time to hate

A time of war and a time of peace

There are a couple of points I want to draw your attention to this morning.

1) Don’t get to comfortable with where you are, what you have and what you are doing, because things just might change. I am reminded of the words of Corrie ten Boom, “Hold everything in your hands lightly; otherwise it hurts when God pries your fingers open.”

2) Keep your focus on what is important, what really matters and verse 11 of Ecclesiastes 3 reminds us what that is. “HE has made everything beautiful in its time. Also HE has put eternity in their hearts,” I am drawn to the fact Solomon said; “He has made everything beautiful in its time.” Honestly I would have written “some things are beautiful” but Solomon said everything is beautiful in its time. That means that area of your life this morning where you hurt the most, God is working for your good. (Romans 8:28). We must understand the next phrase Solomon wrote, “He has put eternity in their hearts.” In order to accept the changes in our life, in order to endure all the changes in our life, you have to weigh the changes with an eternal view. God is changing us, getting us ready for eternity where things will never change.

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus (535BC-475BC) is credited for saying, “The only constant is change.”


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