Honor your heroes with 24 Memorial Day Quotes for Preaching.
Sermons

Summary: 3rd in a series

There Is A Redeemer

Ruth 3:1-18

Chad H. Ballard

Introduction

Today we are going to continue our look at the book of Ruth, GOD’S LOVE STORY FOR US. As we have discussed for the past two weeks, this book of Ruth is an exact parallel to the love affair that should exist between Jesus Christ and us.

Let’s review what we’ve learned:

In Chapter 1, Naomi and her husband and sons move from Bethlehem to Moab because of the famine in the land. Yet Naomi’s husband dies. Her sons marry, but 10 years later, they too die. Naomi sets out to go back to Bethlehem, and one of her daughter’s-in-law, Ruth, insists on coming with her.

The application for us is that we can’t run from God’s conviction, and that we must come to the end of ourselves, to find the beginning of God.

In Chapter 2, we see that upon returning to Bethlehem, Ruth begins to glean grain to sustain them. It turns out that she gleans in Boaz’s field, who falls in love with Ruth, and is very accommodating to her needs.

The application for us is that every one of us is invited to come and find blessing under the wing of God. He loves us and even if we have ran from Him for a very long time, He desires for us to take refuge in His caring and compassionate hands.

Now according to 2:23, Ruth continued to glean in Boaz’s field through both the barley and wheat harvests. During these couple of months, it was becoming more and more apparent that Boaz and Ruth like each other.

Now you need to understand that Naomi has already told Ruth that Boaz is her kinsman redeemer. Now before we go on into the story, I want to explain exactly how the idea of a kinsman-redeemer works.

You’ll remember that God had assigned each family of each tribe a section of the Promised Land to inhabit. Now this land was very important to God and the Israelites. So to make sure that it stayed in the family, the kinsman-redeemer law was instituted.

If a man died and left land and a widow who had bore no sons, his nearest kinsman would be given the opportunity to buy his land and to marry his widow and have sons to carry on the deceased’s name. If he wouldn’t, then the next closest kin could redeem and so on.

But now here was the catch. The kinsman-redeemer couldn’t make the decision to redeem. He had to be asked by the widow to redeem her husbands land.

I. Naomi’s Suggestion

A. Read vv. 1-5. Naomi wants to know what Ruth is waiting for!

1. When she asks “shall I not seek security for you,” I believe what she is implying to Ruth is “am I going to have to ask him for you?”

2. And in v. 2 she says, “is he not our relative?” Naomi is saying to Ruth, “what’s the hold up?”

B. Remember that it is Ruth who must claim Boaz, not the other way around.

C. Now notice that Naomi tells Ruth that Boaz is at the threshing floor. That is significant.

1. Many times we think of the threshing floor as a place of work, and it was. But when the people went to the threshing floor it was a time of feasting and thanking God for an abundant harvest. They would sing psalms praising God for the harvest.


Talk about it...

Joel Sikha

commented on Oct 29, 2016

Join the discussion