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Summary: UNITY IN COMMUNION COMMUNION Paul’s term describing the nature of the Lord’s Supper

UNITY IN COMMUNION

COMMUNION Paul’s term describing the nature of the Lord’s Supper and thus the term used by many church groups to refer to their celebration of Jesus’ final, memorial supper with His disciples. Paul used the Greek term Koinonia to express the basic meaning of the Christian faith, a sharing in the life and death and more importantly the resurrection of Christ, which radically creates a relationship between Christ and the believer and of the believers with one another in a partnership of unity.

Hebrews 10:12 (quickview) , 25 “Christ offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins’ and “by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are sanctified.”

3. It speaks to the present.

a. It is a symbol of our unity and reminds us whom we are to be living for in this life.

b. It reminds us to keep our eyes on Him.

c. It tells us that He is who he said He was and is. We can trust Him today with our lives.

4. It points to the future.

a. We proclaim His death until He comes again. It points to our complete redemption and glorification in Heaven before the Great White Throne.

What does Jesus want to do for us at this gathering? When we celebrate communion, what is Jesus’ purpose.

As we walk along on the Road to Emmaus in Luke 24:13 (quickview) , with the two disciples we must not forget that these two disciples of Jesus had heard the two reports of the resurrection – Mary’s and Peter’s. However, because they hadn’t personally seen the evidence, rather, they didn’t want to check out the evidence for themselves, probably because they were afraid of being caught and possibly receiving a death sentence, they decided to pack it in and head home and go back to their old way of living.

Incredible isn’t it? They gave up on Jesus … but thank God, He didn’t give up on them. Notice the text says, “Jesus himself came up and walked along with them.” I like the way it reads in the King James, “Jesus drew near…” The thought here isn’t that these two disciples were simply geographically distant, but that their faith was distant as well. Jesus knew their need and so He DREW NEAR. He didn’t say, “Fine! You want to leave, you want to doubt, and you want to turn your back on me? Go right ahead. Don’t expect me come to you. When you clean up your act and smarten up and return to where I am, I’ll consider taking you back.” Thank God, Jesus isn’t like that. He knows our weaknesses and our struggles.

We think we’re so much better than those first disciples. We think WE would never act the way they did. Fact is we would … and we do … and most likely we will. Life fogs up our vision, our understanding, our faith, and our hope…

We allow circumstances to over shadow truth.

It’s easy to fall into the cycle of depression.

It’s easy to loose focus.

It’s easy to doubt.

It’s easy to forget.

It’s easy to fall away.

It’s easy to reject.

It’s easy to take for granted.

It’s easy to misunderstand.

It’s easy to give up and give in.

Thank God that in spite of:

1. Our clouded situations and circumstance…

2. Getting lost frequently along the way…


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