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I'm always fascinated by the stories of people who win large sums of money in lotteries. A large majority of whom wish they had never won.

Willie Hurt of Lansing, Mich., won $3.1 million in 1989. Two years later he was broke and charged with murder. His lawyer says Hurt spent his fortune on a divorce and crack cocaine.


Charles Riddle of Belleville, Mich., won $1 million in 1975. Afterward, he got divorced, faced several lawsuits and was indicted for selling cocaine.


Missourian Janite Lee won $18 million in 1993. Lee was generous to a variety of causes, giving to politics, education and the community. But according to published reports, eight years after winning, Lee had filed for bankruptcy with only $700 left in two bank accounts and no cash on hand.


One Southeastern family won $4.2 million in the early '90s. They bought a huge house and succumbed to repeated family requests for help in paying off debts.

The house, cars and relatives ate the whole pot. Eleven years later, the couple is divorcing, the house is sold and they have to split what is left of the lottery proceeds. The wife got a very small house. The husband has moved in with the kids.

William "Bud" Post won $16.2 million in the Pennsylvania lottery in 1988 but now lives on his social security.


"I wish it never happened. It was totally a nightmare," says Post.


A former girlfriend successfully sued him for a share of his winnings. It wasn't his only lawsuit. A brother was arrested for hiring a hit man to kill him, hoping to inherit a share of the winnings. Other siblings pestered him until he agreed to invest in a car business and a restaurant in Sarasota, Fla., -- two ventures that brought no money back and further strained his relationship with his siblings.


Post even spent time in jail for firing a gun over the head of a bill collector. Within a year, he was $1 million in debt.

(http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveMoney/8lotteryWinnersWhoLostTheirMillions.aspx)


Maybe you'll be one of this millions this week who will stand in line and give away your hard earned money for a chance to have it happen to YOU!

Why do we do it?!?

Hunger and thirst. Believing that stuff, security, pleasure and whatever else we believe money can buy will satisfy our hunger and thirst. Getting a mouth full of sand and going back for more.

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