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In the September 11th issue of the Los Angeles Times, Patrick Goldstein wrote an article entitled, ‘Five Years Later: Pop Culture of Denial.’ Its subtitle made a very interesting statement, ‘Our fascination with glitz is unabated, and artists remain cautious. We haven’t come to grips with 9/11.’

In the article Goldstein wrote, ‘Just days after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, a column ran in these pages saying how pop culture would be transformed by the carnage at the World Trade Center. "The terrorist attacks may have brought to a close a decade of enormous frivolity and escapism," observed the writer. "Maybe Hollywood will recognize that Americans suddenly view the world as a more serious place. There’s a new moral gravity out there."

He goes on to say, ‘That, alas, was me, blissfully unaware that it would take more than a horrific catastrophe to quench our thirst for the madcap antics of Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, Star Jones Reynolds, Jessica Simpson and all the other bobble heads bouncing around our celebrity universe. When it comes to frivolity, escapism and a lack of moral gravity, we haven’t lost a step, have we?’

Then he makes this very pointed statement, ‘Is it any wonder so many of us put on our wishful thinking caps, hoping that all this fascination with glitz — and the trashiness behind the glitz — would mercifully evaporate? But the truth is that the trauma of Sept. 11 did not change us, not so much because we live in a culture of superficiality as because we are imprisoned in a culture of hyperactivity. ‘