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We must understand that God’s idea of “good” means that the events as a whole are constructive.


“A woman fell and broke her arm. Is that good? In and of itself it is not, but she went to the hospital, and the doctors found she also had cancer. Because it was found early enough she lived.” 1


But the good is not always immediately seen.


“In the June, 1980 issue of Our Daily Bread, I told how a Christian providentially escaped death. An unexpected delay in New York kept him from catching Flight 191 in Chicago, which crashed with all 254 aboard. That article brought this note from a reader: ‘I just had to let you know about one of God’s great saints who ran to make Flight 191—and made it!’ His name was Edwards E. Elliott, beloved pastor of the Garden Grove Orthodox Presbyterian Church in California. His plane from Pennsylvania was late, and a friend who had accompanied him to Chicago said he last saw him ‘dashing forward” in the terminal to make his connection. As I read about Pastor Elliott’s fruitful ministry, the question I raised in that June devotional challenged me with new urgency: “Was Divine providence operating only in New York and not in Chicago?’ Immediately the words of my correspondent came alive: ‘At the time, Reverend Elliott didn’t know he was indeed running to Heaven...Mrs. Elliott and her four married children comforted the entire church. Their Christian faith and testimony in sorrow was most extraordinary.’ 2


1 Sutherland, Ted. “God Is Good.” Sermon Central. April 2006. September 7, 2006.


2 Swindoll, Charles. “Growing Strong.” Our Daily Bread. June 1980. p. 268.