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RIGHT PRAYER FOR THE WRONG REASON


I began teaching during the Wednesday night prayer meetings seven months ago. Suppose I prayed every day for all those months for God to make us into a praying church. Suppose I prayed morning, noon, and night for God to make us a praying church. Suppose I prayed both persistently and fervently for God to make us a praying church.


God commands us to pray. We know that it is his will. When we pray, we are being obedient. Every time the church prayed in Acts, they received power and God received glory. Praying for God to make us a praying church is praying for the right thing. But it is still possible to ask for the wrong reason.


Suppose, while praying daily for God to make us a praying church, I picture myself teaching about prayer before we pray. The sanctuary is filled to capacity, even though it is not full on Sunday mornings. The balcony is filled to capacity, even though it is not even used on Sunday mornings. All eyes are on me. I announce the scripture. The sudden rush of turning pages is almost thunderous. Then, it is quiet, as everyone waits for me to read. I read. I teach. Through-out the sanctuary, people can be seen feverishly taking notes. The sound of my teaching is repeatedly punctuated by shouts of "Amen!" and "Yes, Lord!" and "Hallelujah!" Everyone is hanging on my every word.


When it is time to pray, groups form everywhere. Prayers raise the roof and heaven comes down. When the glory can no longer be contained, we march out, ready to take Everman for Christ, or die trying.


Suppose, while praying daily for God to make us a praying church, all that is in my mind. Do you think I am praying for God's glory, or my own? I am praying for the right thing, but am I praying with the right motive?

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