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Just off the shore of North Carolina on the island of Cape Hatteras is a village known as Nag’s Head, a small shoreline town where, back in the 1800’s, the “wreckers” lived. These “wreckers” made their living gathering up parts and cargo from ships that had run aground in the night. But these ships didn’t run aground accidentally. No, they were lured into the rocks by these “wreckers” – deceitful men who had fastened a lighted lantern onto the head of an old nag – a horse (thus the name Nag’ Head) – and would then lead the old horse up and down and back and forth on the edge of Diamond Shoals beach. Ships out at sea would mistake the bobbing lantern for the stern light of a ship that they supposed had found safe passage through the mid-Atlantic, and they would, in turn, head in that direction, only to run aground on the rocks. With nowhere to go, the crew and the ship were no contest for the wreckers, who would pillage the ship and all its cargo. In fact, “wrecking” became a thriving business in Nag’s Head, even though it was built on treachery. Even now guests to Nag’s Head can see old homes built and furnished with the material taken from the more than 2,300 ships that were misguided and ultimately destroyed.