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Romans 8:28 is one of the most memorized and quoted verses in the New Testament:  “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” This Scripture brings comfort, direction, and hope to Christians every day. Sadly, it’s also one of the most misquoted and misunderstood verses in the Bible.

Here are three things about this popular verse you may never have noticed.

1.) Romans 8:28 doesn’t mean we can live any way we choose, and God will fix our messes.


To understand the truth of Romans 8:28, we can’t just quote the part of the verse we like: “And we know that in all things God works for the good. . .” and skip the rest, “of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose,”


Romans 8:28 is a promise for believers. Real believers. Those who are living for Christ. Not those who claim to believe in God but are living like the devil.


This verse says to those who love God and are doing their best to obey his commands, “Even though bad/sad/evil/wicked things will touch your life, I (God) will use them to ultimately bring about good, both in your life and in the world.”


Joni Erickson Tada, an inspirational speaker, author, and singer, is a quadriplegic who has been confined to a wheelchair for more than 40 years. When people ask her why God allows suffering, she often says, “God allows what he hates to accomplish what he loves.” And what does God love? For people to enter into relationship with himself and become more like him. Joni’s life and ministry are a stunning testimony of how God can use a tragedy like a paralyzing diving accident to impact the lives of millions.


2.) Romans 8:28 tells us God can use all things together for good.


He doesn’t say all things are good. No matter how rose-colored our glasses are, there’s nothing good about cancer, sex trafficking, or death. Until Jesus returns and conquers Satan once and for all, sin will continue to drag its poisonous tentacles across our world, damaging and destroying everything in its wake.


The truth of Romans 8:28 reminds us that although sin and Satan are powerful, God is more powerful He is able to redeem and restore anything for our good and his glory. All things may not be good, but God can and will use all things for good.


3.) This brings us to the final thing you may never have noticed about Romans 8:28 and its accompanying verse, Romans 8:29 — the ultimate good God wants to accomplish in the lives of his children.


“For those God foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the likeness of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers” (v. 29).

Lori Hatcher is an author, blogger, pastor’s wife, and women’s ministry speaker. She’s the editor of South Carolina’s Reach Out, Columbia magazine, and has authored two devotional books, the Christian Small Publisher’s 2016 Book of the Year, "Hungry for God … Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women" and "Joy in the Journey – Encouragement for Homeschooling Moms". She speaks and writes to help busy women connect with God in the craziness of life. Although Lori graduated from high school and college, she gained her richest education during her 17-year tenure as a homeschooling mom. Possessing a special fondness for small children, furry animals, and chocolate, you’ll find Lori pondering the marvelous and the mundane on her blog. You can find Bible Studies from Lori here:

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Rev. Phyllis Pottorff-Albrecht, United Brethren Communi

commented on Dec 2, 2017

One day, you will need to tackle Romans 8:26 - Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. - Romans 8:26 OR - as the Amplified puts it - So too the [Holy] Spirit comes to our aid and bears us up in our weakness; for we do not know what prayer to offer nor how to offer it worthily as we ought, but the Spirit Himself goes to meet our supplication and pleads in our behalf with unspeakable yearnings and groanings too deep for utterance. This verse has always given me a great deal of comfort - because so much of the "popular" preaching today seems to emphasize the theory that everyone needs to "speak the correct words" in order to have their prayers answered. This passage is assurance that, even when you are so overwhelmed, you are having difficulty forming any type of prayer - the Lord is already rushing His assistance to guide your prayers. When we participated in an Ancestry DNA project, we discovered that the first members of my father's family, who came to North America had left comfortable lives as University professors in Europe had left their homes in 1708 - Just a few months ahead of the coldest winter to hit Europe in the past 500 years. Although many passengers passed away during the six months voyage from England to New York, many of the passengers who arrived in the colonies worked in the tar and pitch industry. This is actually better news than it sounds at first. The severe cold of 1709 destroyed European trees as far south as Florence, Italy. Those left in Europe, who tried to cut down trees to use as firewood - found themselves tackling trees which were more like the trees in the Petrified Forest! The good news was that the killing cold had NOT migrated from Europe to North America - and North American trees were still healthy - healthy enough to provide the tar and pitch which was needed for building - especially building ships. Now, both European and American governments have learned how to conserve forests. Our ancestors, who had been University professors before they left Europe - learned how to cut down trees and put up their own homes. Knowing nothing about tilling the soil, most of their descendants still became farmers - and successful farmers at that. They had all left Europe, searching for religious freedom - and established a new homeland, where they worked to help establish religious freedom for themselves and their descendants. There must have been many times when they all felt overwhelmed by the seemingly impossible tasks ahead of them - yet letters which many left behind show that the more impossible the tasks ahead seemed to be - the more determined they were to look to the Lord for the strength which they knew they would need to continue working in the path which He had set before them.

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