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Summary: The final message in a series leading up to Easter on the Passion of Christ. This meesage focuses on the difference between the three crosses.

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A Tale of Three Crosses

April 11, 2004

The Passion - Luke 23:39-43

Sunday AM

Intro: In reviewing the last hours of Jesus’ life, we often only see one cross dotting the Jerusalem skyline – but to the casual observer that day, the middle cross carried no special significance – just three men dying at the hands of Rome.

Insert: My question is what did the religious leaders hope to accomplish by having Jesus crucified b/w two thieves? Was it for additional humiliation? Was it to add to the shame to this horror? Or was it merely a coincidence?

I believe the Jewish leaders had Jesus crucified b/w two thieves b/c they wanted people to consider Him guilty by association. Yet their sinister plot played perfectly into God’s plan. Isaiah prophesied 700 years prior the Messiah would be “numbered w/ His transgressors.” (Is. 53:12). Little did the Jews know their plot to humiliate Jesus was God’s plan to save mankind.

Note: Jesus was there b/c of God’s perfect plan. He wanted to place His answer to man’s sin right b/w two sinners whose lives hung in the balance of eternity.

Scene: There on either side of Jesus were two dying hecklers – thieves joining in w/ the crowd hurling insults at Jesus. If it weren’t bad enough, the scum of the earth chimed in w/ a few insults of their own. Then something happened. We don’t know why or when, but one of them had a change of heart.

Trans: I can imagine the scene – the one on the left hurls an insult at Jesus fully expecting his friend to return the volley of venom – only this time, the other criminal has a change of heart and replies, “Don’t you fear God?” I can see it now – the solders stop their gambling to look up; The Pharisees paused their celebration to listen in; and Mary wipes her tears to raises her eyes.

Note: The criminal says, “We’re getting what we deserve, but this man has done nothing wrong.” We’re guilty – He’s innocent! We’re dirty – He’s pure! He is not on the cross for His sin. He is on the cross for our sin!

Note: Then he turns to Jesus and asks for forgiveness. Instantly, the blood- stained Savior forgave a sin-soaked criminal and hope was given to the hopeless.

Trans: Three men – three crosses. They all died the same painful death, yet how different the outcome for each. Let’s journey this AM to Mount Calvary.

The Cross of Rejection - Where one man died in sin

The Cross of Repentance - Where one man died to sin

The Cross of Redemption - Where one man died for sin.

I A Cross of REJECTION (The Man Who Died IN Sin)

Trans: We don’t know the names of the two criminals, so to distinguish b/w them, I’ll call the first one Eli and the second one Jake. (Common Jewish names)

Words: Luke calls them “robbers.” Mark uses a word meaning “murderer.” It’s safe to say that these weren’t good guys who happened to slip up as first offenders. These guys were hardened criminals – guilty of multiple offenses of violence.

Story: Yet as Eli hung there, he joined right in w/ the mob mentality. He heard them say, “If you are the Son of God save yourself.” So he parroted what he heard, “If you are the Christ, save yourself and us.”


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Mark Scott

commented on Nov 14, 2008

Excellent message with timely and fresh illustrations. Thanks for providing such a powerful message.

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