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Summary: All of us are charged to have loving concern for our brethren. To serve as their keeper is a great duty, which is strictly required of us, but it is generally neglected by us. Those who are unconcerned in the affairs of their brethren, and take no care, w

“Brother in Trouble, Needs a Real Friend on the Double”

The Language of Cain - “Am I My Brother’s Keeper”

Text: Luke 10:25-37

Introduction: Genesis 4, we have account of the first recorded trial. Long before there was a court room or human jury, God Himself sits as Judge; for he is the God to whom vengeance belongs, and who will be sure to make inquisition for blood, especially the blood of saints.

The Lord said unto Cain, Where is Abel thy brother? Some think Cain’s arraignment occurred the following Sabbath after the murder was committed, when the sons of God came, as usual, to present themselves before the Lord, and Abel was missing. We should always take notice faithful persons are missing in the assembly. The God of heaven takes notice of who is present at and who is absent from public worship. Cain is asked because he had a motive, He was the last to see his brother alive, and because God knew he was guilty.

Cain pled not guilty, and adds rebellion to his sin of murder. He endeavors to cover a deliberate murder with a deliberate lie. How foolish it is to think that we can hide anything from an all seeing God. Cain tries to answer a question with a question. He replies, “Am I my brother’s keeper? Surely he is old enough to take care of himself, nor did I ever take any charge of him." Some think Cain reflects on God and his providence, as if he had said, "Art not you his keeper? If he be missing, the blame is on you, and not on me."

All of us are charged to have loving concern for our brethren. To serve as their keeper is a great duty, which is strictly required of us, but it is generally neglected by us. Those who are unconcerned in the affairs of their brethren, and take no care, when they have opportunity, to prevent their hurt in their bodies, goods, or good name, especially in their souls, do, in effect, speak Cain’s language. The Language of Cain is an attempt to justify oneself. In Luke 10:25-37, Jesus gives us a profile on friendship, but the language of Cain is present. A lawyer responds to Jesus’ teaching by saying in Luke 10:29, “But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?”

There are several facts I want to mention. (1) The road between Jericho and Jerusalem had a bad reputation. It so dangerous that called it the bloody way. There are some roads that should be avoided (2) On the road of life you will find brothers in all kinds of condition: some half wound, half naked and half dead.

Don’t give up on a brother because he is half dead because being half dead means he is half alive. “Brother in trouble needs a real friend on the double.” Real friends will act without considering the sacrifice. They go the extra mile. They make the extra effort.

Why do people ignore half dead people? (1) Some people in our society are considered disposable, to be used and then regarded. (2) Some people in our society are considered to be beyond help (3) while others are in our society are considered to be beyond our area of responsibility. Somebody ought to do something but not me! Listen to this parable another way:

“Now it came to pass that a certain man was traveling Lonesome Street, a lonely and dark road from Tom’s Tavern to Bill’s Bar. After many visits to this bar, the consumption of liquor got a hold of him, stripped him of all his goods and left him destitute and dying on Skid Row. There came that way a certain respected religious leader, a bishop in the church. He saw the drunk with a bleeding skull and vomit covering his clothes. Deciding he was too drunk to talk to about his soul, he thought society should do some¬thing to prohibit such drunkenness. He passed by on the right as far and as fast as possible.

Soon a social worker, whose training taught him how to care for persons with all kinds of social and personal prob¬lems, came that way. He saw the man stretched out on the sidewalk. He looked at him, but concluded that the man was beyond help or hope, he straightway continued on his way.

After some time, an outcast of society, a longhaired motorcycle rider came down Lonesome Street. Though despised by respectable people and watched with suspi¬cion by the police, the biker saw the dying drunk. He came where he was and called a fellow longhaired biker to help him. He spoke soothing words, lifted the man in his arms, and took him to a place where he knew the man would receive care. Now who was the neighbor?”

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