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Summary: David’s story can be summarized like this: A nobody becomes a somebody who then becomes a fugitive and ends up in the end the King of Israel and called a man after God’s own heart – he did everything I wanted him to do.

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Series BC Justice League of Bible Super Heroes:

In a world of chaos and destruction, many are called but few are chosen. Join us as we explore the events surrounding the lives of those biblical heroes; these are the true stories of the BC Justice League.

http://www.whatsyourstoryonline.com/: Quote: Stories are powerful. Stories give meaning to who we are and how we became who we are. Stories help us understand how life happens, and they give value to our experiences. Some of the most powerful testimonies to Christian faith come not from lists of accepted doctrinal beliefs (though they’re important) nor from recitations of biblical principles (also important), but from the enlivened re-telling of how God has acted, overtly or covertly, in each of our lives.

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Sermon: David’s Story pt 2

Thesis: David’s story can be summarized like this: A nobody becomes a somebody who then becomes a fugitive and ends up in the end the King of Israel and called a man after God’s own heart – he did everything I wanted him to do.

Introduction:

There are 66 chapters that speak about David in the Old Testament. As a matter of fact, there are more references to David in the Bible than any other person.

David’s life story is an amazing story of the extremes one person can face in a lifetime: Last week we looked at his early years today let’s look at the middle years.

• The middle years extremes:

o From fame to shame

o From somebody to a fugitive

o From hero to fugitive.

o From hero of Israel to outlaw

o From celebrated to despised

o From loved to hated

o From man of honor to liar

o From security to insecurity

o From hero to villain

o From applause to boo’s

o From married to separated

o From royalty to fugitive

o From riches to poverty

o From sanity to insanity

o From respected to disrespected

o From loyal servant to traitor

• Summary of the extremes: His life is filled with mountain top experiences and low valley dramas. He is slaying giants one day and acting like a crazy man on another day. He is living in riches and then living in poverty. He would be in a palace one day and hiding out in caves on another day. He was respected one day and rejected on another day. He could play the harp and enter into the presence of God and then on another day fall into sin and alienate himself from the one He loved the most. The book of Psalms reflects on David’s highs and lows.

Quote: God's Patience with Our Failures

R. O. Blechman, Dear James: Letters to Young Illustrator (Simon and Schuster, 2009), pp. 30-34 | posted 9/20/2010 - R. O. Blechman is one of the most famous illustrators in the world. In his recent book, Dear James: Letters to a Young Illustrator, he shares a series of letters that he wrote to a younger fellow-illustrator. In one of the most poignant letters, Blechman addresses the reality of failure:

Preliminary drawings and sketches often are discouraging things, pale shadows of one's bold intentions. Seemingly nonsense, they're especially dispiriting for beginners … 'Is that what I did,' the novice might ask, 'and I consider myself an artist?! … Speaking for myself (but also for other illustrators, I'm sure), my trash basket is full of false starts and failed drawings … There should be a Museum of Failed Art. It would exhibit all the terrible art that would have ended up in trash bins and garbage cans, lost and unknown to the public life. Surprisingly, the Bible contains a "Museum of Failed Discipleship." Over and over again, the Gospels record the "false starts" and spiritual failures of the disciples. Thankfully, they also record Christ's willingness to encourage and challenge his flawed disciples. We tend to cover up our heroes' faults; and we're even more likely to gloss over our colossal flops. Instead, the Gospels allow us to see the disciples' failures—and most of those stories came from the disciples themselves. This honesty provides encouragement to us when we feel like saying, "Is that what I did, and I consider myself a Christian?" Our security is in Christ who continues to love us even when we stumble and fail. R. O. Blechman, Dear James: Letters to Young Illustrator (Simon and Schuster, 2009), pp. 30-34


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