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Summary: I think when you look at this text in the Prophet Micah what is going on he is preaching against the reality of business as normal. The Is a sermon that challenges the idea that the beliver can be faithful to God and not do the work of Justice

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Do Good, Micah 6

Micah was one of those eighth-century prophets (along with First Isaiah, Amos, and Hosea) who had the unhappy call "to declare to Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin" (Micah 3:8).

The problem, in Micah's view (not to mention God's) was the failure of God's people to care adequately for -- indeed, even to exploit -- those whom Jesus (following in this same prophetic train) will eventually call "the least of these who are members of my family" (Matthew 25:40).

I think when you look at this text in the Prophet Micah what is going on he is preaching against the reality of business as normal.

I need to be real we must stop doing Church Business as normal the Church is not working

In a political climate that is so often charged with mistrust, deliberate misinformation, and personal attacks, where does that leave the common person? Where does that leave, the person seeking to do the common Good.

Despite what many seem to believe about one another, I would argue that all of us are relatively decent and moral people.

Sure, we all live in a time marked by fear; we have lived through numerous years of violence, insecurity, deception, corruption, and exile.

But as Christians, we desire to follow the path of Jesus in our own lives and recognize that salvific words, actions, and theologies of our Christian heritage.

Despite claiming to believe in Jesus’ actions, power, and words, it appears that many of us have become drunk on the empty promises of American life; in our pursuit of the disappearing American dream, we have come to respect individuality over community, wealth of pocket over the wealth of spirit, pulling others down instead of lifting one another up, and so on.

In many ways, we have become the opposite of Jesus of Nazareth in our pursuit of the blasphemy of American Christianity.

Our reading for today is chapter six, verse eight from the book of Micah; the eponymous prophet lived and practiced his work during the 8th and 7th centuries BCE in the land of Judah.

Micah’s work took place in a time that was marred with violence (specifically through the fall of Samaria and an invasion by an Assyrian king named Sennacherib) and questions of how to properly devote oneself to the worship of God.

Like many other prophets from the Hebrew Bible, Micah spends much of his prophesying to the people on the importance and need for doing social justice.

Per prophets like Micah, the people have experienced and will continue to experience so much violence and unease because they have forgotten to help the poor, oppressed, and widows.

We can see these themes of social justice echoed in our verse for today: “...what the LORD requires of you: Only to do justice and to love goodness.”

Justice is not the same as equality because equality presumes that all persons have equal standing on which to receive aid.

Justice requires us to humble ourselves to provide others with the same opportunities and benefits that we unequally reap from their misfortunes and losses in life.


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