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Summary: Joseph, like Jacob, stands out as one of the most delightful and exciting characters in the Old Testament. God had given him many meaningful dreams, and he rather brashly reported them to his family. Even though we recognize that Joseph was chosen by God

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Title: Dream, But Don’t Make Dreams Your Master

Text: "Here comes that master-dreamer," they exclaimed. (Genesis 37:19).

Scripture Reading: Gen 37:1-28 (Living)

Introduction

Joseph, like Jacob, stands out as one of the most delightful and exciting characters in the Old Testament. All but one of Joseph’s brothers was born of different mothers, making for a diversity of interest and an intensely competitive spirit among the brothers and ultimately leading to hostility. The tension between Joseph and his brothers is reminiscent of the conflict between Jacob and Esau. But even though Jacob and Esau had their differences, in the end they seem to have been reconciled to the point that they did not seek to harm one another.

Joseph, on the other hand, remained a possible threat to his brothers, at least in their own minds, until the very end. Although he had forgiven them and given them positions of privilege in Egypt, they feared that after their father died Joseph would retaliate for the evil they had done to him. Today’s message concerns Joseph’s early years.

God had given him many meaningful dreams, and he rather brashly reported them to his family. Even though we recognize that Joseph was chosen by God for a great mission, he was still a human being, and we are not irreverent to point out certain signs of his immaturity.

There are three components to our Bible study; I want you to see first that DREAMS ARE IMPORTANT.

Joseph’s story begins this way:

“So Jacob settled again in the land of Canaan, where his father had lived” (v. 1).

Apparently Jacob has moved south of Bethlehem and settled in a place near Hebron. This is the place where Abraham had made his home. It is the place of fellowship, of communion with God.

“Jacob's son Joseph was now seventeen years old. His job, along with his half brothers, the sons of his father's wives Bilhah and Zilpah, was to shepherd his father's flocks. But Joseph reported to his father some of the bad things they were doing” (v. 2).

We can see that the bunch of boys Jacob had, were real problem children (with the exception of Joseph and Benjamin). It took these men a long time to learn the lessons God would teach them.

Joseph was only seventeen, just a teenager, when this incident took place. He brought a bad report to his father about the other boys. Of course they didn’t like it. I’m sure they called him a tattletale or worse.

Next we read:

“Now as it happened, Israel loved Joseph more than any of his other children, because Joseph was born to him in his old age. So one day Jacob gave him a special gift--a brightly colored coat” (v. 3).

Jacob should have learned a lesson from his experiences as a young man. He knew that to play favorites would cause trouble in a family. His own father had favored his older brother Esau, and Jacob knew what it was like to be discriminated against. But here he practices the very same thing. We can understand his feelings, knowing that Rachel was the wife whom he really loved—she was the one fine thing in his life—and Joseph her son is really a fine boy, and Jacob loved him dearly. While all this is true, it still is not an excuse. He should not have made him that brightly colored coat.


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