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Summary: A sermon about Jesus seeking those on the margins.

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“God Calling: Matthew”

Matthew 9:9-13

I know that I’m a sinner.

I often find that I am a slave to ways of being that I want to change.

I am sick and in need of healing.

So, Jesus has come for me.

And that is what Jesus does.

And that’s what Jesus did for Matthew, isn’t it?

(pause)

In our Gospel Lesson for this morning, we are told that Jesus was walking along and He “saw” Matthew… “a man named Matthew.”

Jesus saw a person.

And Jesus saw all the vulnerabilities of this person.

Jesus saw this person who was being used by the Romans as a tool and was despised by his own people.

Jesus saw this person who had become a tax collector.

He saw what had drawn him to turn his back on his heritage and work for the oppressors of his race.

He saw the insecurities and fears that played and worked in Matthew’s life to bring him to this point.

He saw the assaults on his self-worth that damaged him and had made him ripe to accept this as his life’s work.

He saw the despair that Matthew must have felt—knowing that he would never be anything other than what he was now—a despised tax collector.

How many other people had ever really “seen” Matthew?

Or had he only felt the judgment of others his entire life?

Had he always lived on the margins?

I mean, what had possessed him to turn to such a wicked profession?

Had he always felt like he didn’t fit?

Perhaps he had never sensed or experienced an unconditional love from his parents, siblings, and extended family.

Maybe he had a father who would come home drunk and take his frustrations out on little Matthew saying: “You’ll never amount to anything!!!”

Perhaps he had been bullied on the playground.

Maybe he had been socially awkward or shy, and thus felt shunned by his peers.

Maybe he had always been a loner, not that he wanted to be a loner—but a loner just the same.

Perhaps he felt that people were never gonna like him for who he was anyway so he might just as well, at the very least, get rich by becoming a turncoat Jew and ripping off folks for the Roman government.

And of course, as these decisions always do—they made Matthew’s life even worse.

They caused Matthew to be truly, truly hated.

And so, when people looked Matthew’s way they would give him “the evil eye,” or the “angry look,” or the “blank stare.”

Because everyone who looked at him saw only one thing: a man that they hated; a man that they despised.

Have you ever had someone who despised you, for whatever reason?

Or have you ever been hated, even if for but an instant, because of a remark you made or something insensitive you said to someone?

If so, you know the look someone gets in their eyes when they hate you.

Even driving too slow on the freeway or meandering at a light after it has turned green can cause someone to give us that look.

Minorities in this country probably can bring the image of that look into their minds much faster than a fair-skinned, light haired Anglo such as myself.


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