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Summary: God’s desire for us has always been that we respond to his grace with simply trust.

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Title: Into the Hyperlinks with Jesus

Text: John 3:14-21 (Numbers 21:4-9 and Psalm 107:1-6)

Thesis: God’s desire for us has always been that we respond to his grace in faith.

Introduction

It is common knowledge that Charles Colson was known as President Richard Nixon’s “hatchet man.” Slate Magazine writer David Plotz described Colson as “the evil genius of an evil administration.” And Colson himself has written that he was “valuable to the President… because I was willing… to be ruthless in getting things done.” (http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Colson)

Chuck Colson was a man in need of being “born again.”

You may recall that on the eve of his conviction and imprisonment for obstructing justice, Colson had a dramatic conversion experience. After his release from prison Chuck Colson founded Prison Fellowship and wrote his personal memoir, Born Again in 1976.

In July of 2005 biographer Jonathan Aitken published an authorized biography of Colson’s life titled Charles Colson: A Life Redeemed, in which he wrote that Charles Colson is perhaps the most famous born-again Republican after George W. Bush. He also described Colson as “America’s best-known Christian leader, after Billy Graham.”

Max Blumenthal, writing in the Washington Monthly suggested another title for this new biography might be Born Again, Again. (Max Blumenthal, Born again, Again, Washington Monthly, July/August 2005)

The born again terminology prompts derision in the minds of some people. Max Blumenthal seems to think being born again is some sort of smoke screen to cover up and white wash the past or the skeptical thought that most people never really change. And others like Joe Queenan, whose Op-Ed piece triggered by the apology offered by Bernie Maddox after having bilked a bunch of people, was printed in the Denver Post, is just tired of what he calls empty apologies and would like to ban public apologies issued by con artists, politicians, captains of industry, religious leaders, and athletes. (Joe Queenan, Apology Not Accepted, The Denver Post, 13B, March 18, 2009)

But mostly, I think the term is confusing. In our text today Nicodemus is having a conversation with Jesus in which Jesus tells Nicodemus, “I assure you, unless you are born again, you can never see the Kingdom of God.” Nicodemus’ immediate response was, “What do you mean? How can an old man go back into his mother’s womb and be born again?”

Then Jesus goes on to talk about being born of water and the Spirit and of how humans can only reproduce human life but the Spirit gives new life from heaven. And Nicodemus asks once again, “What do you mean?” Nicodemus is confused. He needs clarity.

It is as if Jesus realized that maybe understanding the intricacies of the new birth are not as important as seeing that Nicodemus experienced the new birth… that Nicodemus understand that he must place his faith in Jesus Christ as his Savior. So he takes a different approach… an approach he thinks a Jewish religious leader would understand. He refers to an Old Testament story found in Numbers 21:4-9.


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