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Summary: Revelation does not mean "to conceal". It is meant to be read and understood. This is an introduction to a long sermon series on the entire Apocalypse and gives my interpretive foundational views of the book.

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An Introduction to the Book of Revelation

Revelation 21:1-7

Rev. Mark A. Barber

It might seem at first strange to begin a sermon series on the Book of Revelation from a passage at the end of the book rather than the beginning. However, there is a good reason for this. The book of Revelation is full of symbols and visions which are difficult to understand. This difficulty can be seen in the fact that there are so many interpretations of it. This is true among preachers and theologians who hold to the full authority and inspiration of Revelation and the rest of Scripture. The very fact that learned men and women who have spent their lives studying the Apocalypse should serve as a warning to us to be reverent and careful in the treating of Revelation. Revelation is full of what has been described as “word pictures”. These pictures make the book come alive and stimulate the imagination. It has been said that a picture paints a thousand words.” Here a thousand words paints a picture. The problem with a picture, of course, is that no two people can fully agree what thousand words the picture is saying.

So we come to this beautiful passage at the end of the book. It tells us that for those who persevere, everything is going to work out. This is an affirmation of the promise of Romans 8:28: “For those who love God, all things work together for the good, to those who are the called according to His purpose. We don't know what lies in our immediate future. There is much to be concerned about. And the Book of Revelation sounds scary. But Christians should not be frightened about the future as God will lead us on the way. If one is not a Christian, they should be very concerned.

I am not going to try to tell you that I have it all figured out. I can speculate as well as the next person. But our salvation in Jesus Christ is by grace through faith alone. It is certainly not earned even in the least part from our works. These include the works of the intellect. But at the same time, the fact that we are saved by grace through faith alone should not make us complacent as though our works do not count. One can be assured of this from Revelation 14:13: “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord; for this saith the Spirit, they shall have rest from their labor, and their works do follow them”. We read elsewhere that God will not forget our labor of love. The text we have already alluded to in Ephesians that God has prepared good works in advance for us to do.

In the same way, we must be diligent to study God's Word. And this includes Revelation, even if it is difficult to understand. A Christian should be well informed by the Book of Deuteronomy that we must engage our intellect as well as our emotion. It is not just with all of our hearts but all of our minds and strength as well. And we are told in Revelation itself that it is God's will for His people to understand it. In Revelation 22:10: “Do not seal up the prophetic words in this book”. The very word “Revelation” means “to reveal”, not hide. So let us not be afraid to enter into the study of God's word.


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