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Summary: When Calamity struck the house of Job, his friends came at great trouble and inconvenience to counsel him. Job’s friends held to the traditional thoughts of their day, which in many respects are still the thoughts of our day. They believed that God always

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Title: Is There a Connection Between Sin and Suffering?

Text: Job 2:9-13 (KJV)

9 Then said his wife unto him, Dost thou still retain thine integrity? curse God, and die.

10 But he said unto her, Thou speakest as one of the fooish women speaketh. What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil? In all this did not Job sin with his lips.

11 Now when Job's three friends heard of all this evil that was come upon him, they came every one from his own place; Eliphaz the Temanite, and Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite: for they had made an appointment together to come to mourn with him and to comfort him.

12 And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.

13 So they sat down with him upon the ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him: for they saw that his grief was very great.

When Calamity struck the house of Job, his friends came at great trouble and inconvenience to counsel him. Job’s friends held to the traditional thoughts of their day, which in many respects are still the thoughts of our day. They believed that God always rewards righteousness. And they believed that God always punishes wickedness. They supposed that righteousness always pays off with peace, prosperity, and popularity; and that it always leads to eternal life.

Job’s friends saw God as a judge. They understood Him somewhat in terms of His being a prosecuting attorney or a policeman. They believed that God’s law was self-operating and self-executing, and that if you found yourself in great pain and suffering, it was proof that you were a great sinner.

The writer of the book of Job challenges all of our simple solutions to the complex questions that plague us when we are faced with pain and trouble. The easy answer is usually the incorrect answer.

They believed God to be an executioner. While we recognize that sin ultimately results in suffering, when you study the book of Job, you cannot help but to conclude that not all suffering is the direct result of sin.

The first thing that we should understand is that Job was a very good man who did not deserve to suffer as he was suffering.

He suffered the loss of all his worldly property. He suffered the tragic death of his children. He suffered the absence of a sympathetic wife. But in her case, perhaps we need to cut her a little slack, because she may have been suffering from deep depression when she came to him and advised him to commit suicide and escape his pain.

But Job also suffered the misunderstanding of his sincere friends. And he suffered the loss of his health-boils covered his body from head to foot. He suffered indescribable pain.

Is there a connection between sin and suffering? The answer could be yes, and the answer could just as well be no.The second thing to consider about his situation is that Job’s suffering is attributed to Satan (Job 2:7-8). Job is an excellent illustration of this truth. In Job 1:6, we learn that, “there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them.” He came into the presence of God to accuse Job of having evil intentions.


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