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Summary: Salvation message about those who are close to being saved, but have never been cleansed.

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Is There A Judas Among Us?

Mark 14:10,11

Would you name your son Judas? One pastor began his sermon with that question and then followed with this illustration! Does being called a particular name really make any difference? Ask the daughter of Texas Governor James Hogg, who was the first native born governor of Texas, serving just before the turn of the 20th century. He and wife Sarah didn’t really think much about the name they chose for their daughter. They were simply trying to honor Jim’s brother Thomas, by naming her after the heroine of the Civil War poem he had written. So when their second born discovered America on July 10, 1882, they named their bouncing baby girl, “Ima”.

Miss Hogg later recounted: "My grandfather Stinson lived 15 miles from Mineola and news traveled slowly. When he learned of his granddaughter’s name he came trotting to town as fast as he could to protest but it was too late. The christening had taken place, and Ima I was to remain." Ima Hogg. What a name! Can you imagine introducing yourself? “What is your name?” “Ima Hogg.”

Fortunately, Ima Hogg made something of her life in spite of her name. She founded a symphony orchestra, served on the Board of Education and championed music in the schools of Texas and served in Washington D.C. in the Department of Education. She made something of her life in spite of her name. Be careful what you name your children! But I don’t know of very many people throughout history that were named Judas.

Leonardo Da Vinci, the noted Italian artist, painted the Last Supper. It took seven years for him to complete it. The figures representing the twelve Apostles and Christ himself were painted from living persons. The life-model for the painting of the figure of Jesus was chosen first.

When it was decided that Da Vinci would paint this great picture, hundreds and hundreds of young men were carefully viewed in an endeavor to find a face and personality exhibiting innocence and beauty, free from the scars and signs of dissipation caused by sin.

Finally, after weeks of laborious search, a young man nineteen years of age was selected as a model for the portrayal of Christ. For six months Da Vinci worked on the production of this leading character of his famous painting. During the next six years Da Vinci continued his labors on this sublime work of art. One by one fitting persons were chosen to represent each of the eleven Apostles - with space being left for the painting of the figure representing Judas Iscariot as the final task of this masterpiece.

This was the Apostle, you remember, who betrayed his Lord for thirty pieces of silver. For weeks Da Vinci searched for a man with a hard, callous face, with a countenance marked by scars of avarice, deceit, hypocrisy, and crime. A face that would delineate a character who would betray his best friend.

After many discouraging experiences in searching for the type of person required to represent Judas, word came to Da Vinci that a man whose appearance fully met his requirements had been found in a dungeon in Rome, sentenced to die for a life of crime and murder. Da Vinci made the trip to Rome at once, and this man was brought out from his imprisonment in the dungeon and led out into the light of the sun. There Da Vinci saw before him a dark, swarthy man his long shaggy and unkempt hair sprawled over his face, which betrayed a character of viciousness and complete ruin. At last the famous painter had found the person he wanted to represent the character of Judas in his painting. By special permission from the king, this prisoner was carried to Milan where the picture was being painted. For months he sat before Da Vinci at appointed hours each day as the gifted artist diligently continued his task of transmitting, to his painting, this base character representing the traitor and betrayer of our Savior.


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