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Summary: Making changes is tough and too often we do what Moses did and snap back to doing things the way we’ve always done them, but that’s not always God’s way!

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“Let There Be a New and Better Way” – Numbers 20:8-12 January 2, 2005

Read Numbers 20:8-12

Ask: Do you notice anything wrong in that passage?

Look again…

– God tells Moses to gather up three things: Aaron, his brother and “assistant pastor”; the staff, the symbol of Moses’ work as a shepherd both of sheep and of God’s people; and his entire community which would serve as a witness to a miracle which would be God’s response to their grumbling and complaining.

– God gives Moses specific details for procuring his provision: this will be a public display of God’s power; Moses is to speak to the rock (which could have been a craggy rock that was part of a hillside or outcropping of boulders); by Moses’ command enough water would come forth for the entire community and all of their animals. Wow! This is going to be so cool. But wait. What happens?

Moses does gather up his brother, the staff and the people.

Moses does hear God’s promise and believes enough to mobilize the community out to the rock.

But here it comes –

Moses is so frustrated with this group of whiners and complainers that he disregards God’s instructions and what does he do? He smacks the rock, not once but twice!

God honors his promise and the water gushes forth…but God’s not happy. Why? Because Moses disobeyed.

What did God tell Moses to do at the rock?

What did Moses do?

Every miracle before this required Moses to touch something or do something with the staff; every time God worked through him the staff was directly involved.

This time it’s different. God is trying to move Moses to a new and better way of doing things.

Now it was time to speak God’s word to the problem.

Moses didn’t accept the new and better way; instead he went back to the old way of doing things, and it cost him his right to enter the promise land.

We have entered a new year. 2005! Can you believe it?

What I believe is that God is going to point us to a new and better way, just like he did Moses.

My worry is that we’ll snap back to doing things the old way (i.e., the way we’re comfortable with), like Moses did, and lose the opportunity to make steps toward becoming a “promised land” church. That’s a church open to a bigger, better future; a church that looks forward to God’s promises of what will be and backward longingly at what God’s blessings were.

I’m going to try a little metaphor here to help us see what we are and what we ought to be.

I want to introduce the idea that as we look down the pipe of a new year, we can be one of three kinds of churches.

1) The Play-Doh Church

Play-Doh can be molded into any shape, but once it becomes hardened, there’s no changing it.

You can’t rework it, reshape it or even recycle it. Its first design becomes its only design.

The Play-Doh church has a tough time becoming anything that it isn’t.

It’s hardened almost to the point of being petrified.

If you even try to change the Play-Doh church, it will fall to pieces.

2) The Rubber Band Church

A rubber band can be stretched, but only to a limit. It has a pretty limited use and a basic purpose: to hold things together and wrap things up. If left to itself, it will snap back to its original shape, which can be any of a number of shapes.


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