We've released a new version of SermonCentral! Read the release notes here.
Sermons

Summary: Year A. 4th Sunday of Advent –December 30th, 2001 Title: “Listing to human advice even when it conflicts with the Divine Word.” Isaiah 7: 10-14

Year A. 4th Sunday of Advent –December 30th, 2001

Title: “Listing to human advice even when it conflicts with the Divine Word.”

Isaiah 7 (quickview) : 10-14

Ahaz was the Davidic king of Judah, the southern kingdom, from 735 until 715BC. Israel’s king, the northern kingdom, also called Ephraim, Pekah, and Syria’s king, Syria is also known as Aram, Rezin, wanted Ahaz to team up with them to fight Assyria, the really large and powerful kingdom threatening the entire region. Ahaz was in a dilemma. He knew from Isaiah that God did not want him to side with either Israel and Syria or with Assyria, but his human advisers were telling him he had to do one or the other. Israel and Syria were plotting against Ahaz at this point in order to dethrone him and place a non-Davidic successor, “the son of Tabeel,” on his throne, thereby interrupting the Davidic line, the line of the promised Messiah. Since Ahaz believed in and worshiped idols, specifically Baal, sacrificed his own son in the valley of Hinnom, Gehenna, and desecrated the Temple, he was little inclined to listen to the prophet Isaiah who would tell him to trust in the Lord and not in human advisers. Human wisdom dictated that Ahaz would never be able to withstand the combined power of Israel and Syria. In fact, at this point, they had already defeated Ahaz in battle. Divine wisdom, on the other hand, was saying through the prophet that they will not be successful in dethroning him or in defeating Assyria. He does not need to ally with Assyria and should not. He is to leave his and his country’s fate in the hands of God.

Historically, Ahaz represents the dilemmas kings find themselves in regarding national security, personal security and foreign policy. Metaphorically, Ahaz stands for all people who listen to human advice even when it conflicts with the divine Word, who panic and take matters into their own hands, consciously ignoring the Word of God, who want the quick fix rather that the long term solution.

In verse ten, the Lord spoke to Ahaz: This means that the Lord was speaking through Isaiah to Ahaz, not directly. In this second encounter with Isaiah Ahaz has clearly made up his mind. He is no longer confused and vacillating; he is angry at the prophet for not just keeping quiet and going away. The prophet is bothering, “wearying,” his conscience.

In verse eleven, ask for a sign: “Sign,” Hebrew ‘ot, was not necessarily an event or object that was miraculous in itself, although it often could be and was. However, a “sign,” could be a natural happening or ordinary thing that was vested with extraordinary meaning, a meaning open only to one of faith. Even extraordinary events were not seen as signs by the unbelieving, the hard hearted, whom Isaiah calls “blind, deaf, dumb, lame.” The “sign,” in question here is a birth and naming of a child. Although not miraculous or extraordinary in itself, it will turn out to be just that.

Deep as the nether world or high as the sky: This is obvious hyperbole for “anything at all.” Isaiah is prepared to give Ahaz any “sign,” he asks for in order to convince him of the truth of God’s word to him. It is not unusual for a sign to be offered without being requested (cf 1Sam 10:7, 9; 1Sam 2:34; 2Kgs 19:29; Is 37:30).


Browse All Media

Related Media


A Leap Of Faith
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Angels Among Us
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion