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Summary: Have you ever wondered what Jesus was like as a child? The bible dosent tell us much but it does reveal that our children can be like Jesus…but we have to do our part as well.

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1 PETER 1:14-16 AS OBEDIENT CHILDREN, DO NOT BE CONFORMED TO THE PASSIONS OF YOUR FORMER IGNORANCE, BUT AS HE WHO CALLED YOU IS HOLY, YOU ALSO BE HOLY IN ALL YOUR CONDUCT, SINCE IT IS WRITTEN, “YOU SHALL BE HOLY, FOR I AM HOLY

What was it like to raise Jesus the Messiah?

• Was he a perfect child?

• Did he ever make mistakes?

• Did he ever have to learn anything?

"When Joseph and Mary had done everything required by the Law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth. And the child grew and became strong; he was filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was upon him." (2:40)

Two verbs describe this growth.

• "Grew," the Greek verb auxano, "to become greater, grow, increase."

• "Become strong" (NIV) or "wax strong" (KJV) is the Greek verb krataioo, "become strong."

• It can refer to physical strength, as it probably does here, as well as psychological and spiritual strength.

Jesus grew, but did he learn?

• He didn't start out from infancy with all knowledge -- he had "emptied himself" of omniscience when he became a man (Philippians 2:7). HE EMPTIED HIMSELF, TAKING THE FORM OF A BONDSERVANT AND MADE IN THE LIKENESS OF MAN

• We humans learn as toddlers by observing, trial and error.

• We learn language by imitation and correction.

• We learn responsibility by parental rules and enforcement until those rules

• Eventually those values will become internalized.

• Did Jesus learn this way, too? I expect so.

Though Jesus had to learn like the rest of us, God specially gifted him.

• This verse tells us that he was "filled with wisdom" and that "the grace of God was upon him"

• Here, the common Greek noun charis, "grace" seems to mean "a beneficent disposition toward someone, favor, grace, gracious care/help, or goodwill.

"Every year his parents went to Jerusalem for the Feast of the Passover." (2:41)

• Theoretically, Jewish men were required to go to three feasts in Jerusalem each year -- Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles –

• Though only the Passover was strictly observed. Those at some distance, especially the poor, could not attend all the feasts. But women -- and sometimes children -- might attend, too

• Passover celebrated God delivering the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt, and pilgrims to the feast would stay a minimum of two days, sometimes longer.

"When he was twelve years old, they went up to the Feast, according to the custom. After the Feast was over, while his parents were returning home, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but they were unaware of it. Thinking he was in their company, they traveled on for a day. Then they began looking for him among their relatives and friends. When they did not find him, they went back to Jerusalem to look for him." (2:42-45)

• Pilgrims to the feast in Jerusalem usually traveled in a large party or caravan because a person traveling by himself was in danger from bandits

• The caravan was made up of many of Mary and Joseph's friends and relatives from Galilee, and they naturally supposed that Jesus was somewhere in the crowd.

• No doubt when they camped for the night and Jesus was nowhere to be seen, they became alarmed.

• "To look for" (NIV) or "seeking" (KJV) in verses 44 and 45 is the Greek verb anazeteo, "to try to locate by search, look, search for someone." It is used in early papyrus documents of searching for criminals and fugitive slaves, or for a lost work of literature.

"After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers." (2:46-47)

• And where was he? Deeply engrossed in discussion with the learned teachers. "Teachers" (NIV) or "doctors" (KJV) is the common Greek noun didaskalos, "teachers." Here it refers to "scripture scholars.

• Most would think Jesus was teaching those scholars a thing or two, but that wasn’t the case

• The Temple Sanhedrin would teach between the morning and evening sacrifice

• A 12 yr. old boy would have never been allowed to teach

• But they were allowed to ask questions

• Jesus’ "Understanding" is the Greek noun sunesis, "the faculty of comprehension, intelligence, acuteness, shrewdness." Everyone who heard Jesus on this occasion was struck by his understanding.

• Their “amazement” comes from the Greek word existemi, which means the feeling of astonishment mingled with fear, caused by events, which are miraculous, extraordinary, or difficult to understand.

"When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, 'Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you.'" (2:48)

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