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Summary: How do we react to the awareness of Christ as King?

The King of Glory (Responsive Reading)

Psalm 24:7-10, Rev. 15:3-4

Leader: Lift up your heads, O you gates; be lifted up, you ancient doors,

People: That the King of glory may come in.

Leader: Who is this King of glory?

People: The LORD strong and mighty, the LORD mighty in battle.

Leader: Lift up your heads, O you gates; lift them up, you ancient doors

People: That the King of glory may come in.

Leader: Who is he, this King of glory?

People: The LORD Almighty—he is the King of glory.

ALL: “Great and marvelous are your deeds, Lord God Almighty. Just and true are your ways, King of the ages. Who will not fear you, O Lord, and bring glory to your name? For you alone are holy. All nations will come and worship before you, for your righteous acts have been revealed.”

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Where is He ... the King of the Jews?

Matthew 2:2

Big Idea: How do we react to the awareness of Christ as King?

INTRO:

>> Show the Video: “That’s My King.”

Do you have your cell phones with you this morning? I have a question to ask and you’ll want to text me your answer – we will refer to them later in the service.

In John 19:14 Pilate looks at the gathered mob and says, “Behold Your King!” They, of course had a reaction that led to the events that followed … the crucifixion.

But that gathered mob is not the only ones that react to such a declaration. Humankind has reacted to the startling reality of Christ as King ever since and they have reacted in a myriad of ways.

Here’s your text question … I stand before you today and introduce Jesus to you by saying, “Behold your king!”

What is your personal and initial response to the reality that Jesus is your King?

SERMON:

I want to read a single simple verse to you from the Gospels this morning. In Matthew 2:2 (the story of Jesus’ birth) the Magi ask a question that is addressed over and over from many different vantage point through the remainder of the book. The question: "Where is he who has been born king of the Jews?"

You see, the Kingship of Jesus is a clear and essential thread that runs through the Gospels and, in fact, through both the Old and New Testaments.

• The Jews awaited one from the lineage of David who would again sit on the throne and reign as King and Messiah.

• Today, we await the return of the King. We await the day when, as Revelation 15 says, the redeemed will sing “Great and marvelous are your deeds, Lord God Almighty. Just and true are your ways, King of the nations.”

Until that time, we wait and anticipate and point others to the one “born king of the Jews."

Throughout Matthew’s Gospel Jesus is postured as a King who has brought / is bringing His Kingdom. His coronation is on this day, Palm Sunday, and is recounted with detail in Matthew 21:1-9.

And yet, with all of this (and more) the Magi’s question is still valid today: "Where is he who has been born king of the Jews?"

Some still ask:

• “So where is this King?”

• “What does this King look like?”

• “How does this King make himself known to us today?”

These are all good questions … maybe questions you have even asked.

The problem for us Americans is that we have no solid idea of or experience with a king.

• I recently read an article on salon.com about the death of “The King.” They were giving sordid details about Elvis Presley’s death.

• I lived in the Chicago area in the late 80’s and there was a group of guys who came to town occasionally to play ball against Michael Jordon and company called “The Sacramento Kings.”

• When I was working on my doctoral dissertation, which centered on juvenile gangs, I was introduced to the “Latin Kings.”

None of these kings will be much help in spotting "he who has been born king of the Jews." They have nothing in common with our King.

Others throughout history have had problems identifying the King we seek too.

The Jews did not recognize him and when a placard was placed on His cross in multiple languages saying “Jesus of Nazareth, the king of the Jews.” They simply could not conceive of it.

What is your answer when seekers ask the question? Your texts might give insight to that.

May I suggest that when seekers ask, "Where is he who has been born king of the Jews?" that they should be able to look to Jesus’ church for the answer? You see, Jesus’ church is filled with “citizens of His Kingdom.” Seekers should be able to look at the church and see evidence that His Kingdom has come / is coming – that His will is being done on earth as it is in heaven.

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