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Summary: This Psalm is basically a plea for divine vindication with regard to the oppressor’s allegations and actions. David’s confidence in the divine judge is the backbone of Psalm 7. Abraham was also one who had the utmost confidence in God bringing judgment.

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Tom Lowe

Psalm 7—Perfect man in the midst of false witnesses.

Title: Shiggaion of David, which he sang unto the LORD, concerning the words of Cush the Benjamite.

1 O LORD my God, in thee do I put my trust: save me from all them that persecute me, and deliver me:

2 Lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

3 O LORD my God, if I have done this; if there be iniquity in my hands;

4 If I have rewarded evil unto him that was at peace with me; (yea, I have delivered him that without cause is mine enemy:)

5 Let the enemy persecute my soul, and take it; yea, let him tread down my life upon the earth, and lay mine honour in the dust. Selah.

6 Arise, O LORD, in thine anger, lift up thyself because of the rage of mine enemies: and awake for me to the judgment that thou hast commanded.

7 So shall the congregation of the people compass thee about: for their sakes therefore return thou on high.

8 The LORD shall judge the people: judge me, O LORD, according to my righteousness, and according to mine integrity that is in me.

9 Oh let the wickedness of the wicked come to an end; but establish the just: for the righteous God trieth the hearts and reins.

10 My defense is of God, which saveth the upright in heart.

11 God judgeth the righteous, and God is angry with the wicked every day.

12 If he turn not, he will whet his sword; he hath bent his bow, and made it ready.

13 He hath also prepared for him the instruments of death; he ordaineth his arrows against the persecutors.

14 Behold, he travaileth with iniquity, and hath conceived mischief, and brought forth falsehood.

15 He made a pit, and digged it, and is fallen into the ditch which he made.

16 His mischief shall return upon his own head, and his violent dealing shall come down upon his own pate.

17 I will praise the LORD according to his righteousness: and will sing praise to the name of the LORD most high.

Introduction

This Psalm is basically a plea for divine vindication with regard to the oppressor’s allegations and actions. David’s confidence in the divine judge is the backbone of Psalm 7. Abraham was also one who had the utmost confidence in God bringing judgment to the wicked.

That be far from thee to do after this manner, to slay the righteous with the wicked: and that the righteous should be as the wicked, that be far from thee: Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right? (Genesis 18:25)

The title of this psalm contains one of the most enigmatic terms found in the superscriptions of the psalms—“a Shiggaion (Heb.) of David.” It is probably related to the idea of wondering, reeling, veering, or weaving. Although the NKJV translates it “meditation,” it more than likely conveys shifting emotions or movements of thought. Consequently, the term may also indicate the song’s irregularity in rhythm. “He sang” also indicates this was a vocal solo. The occasion or reason given for the writing is concerning the words of Cush* the Benjamite; but it cannot be readily identified from the historical books; however, whoever this was or whatever the name represented, some enemy had obviously been making false charges against David. It is generally assumed that this psalm belongs to the period of Saul’s persecution. The theme is God’s vindication of His servant and judgment on his enemies

* Note: The Talmud identifies Cush with Saul; he may have been one of Saul’s fanatical fellow-tribesmen, like Shimei (2 Sam. 16:5)

Commentary

1 O LORD my God, in thee do I put my trust: save me from all them that persecute me, and deliver me:

2 Lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

David prays for deliverance—“save me . . . deliver me.” This appeal is based upon his personal trust in God. The attack of the enemy also appears personal, as indicated by the terms “persecute me,” “deliver me,” and “my soul.” The attack on the psalmist is made by one person, which we gather from the phrases “Lest he tear my soul” (v. 2), “If I have rewarded evil unto him” (v. 4), and “I have delivered him” (v. 4).

The situation appears to involve David defending himself from false accusations made against him by his enemies; one of which (Cush) is to be particularly feared because he is said here to be as violent as an angry lion. Cush lied about David, and Saul pursued David. David fled to the Lord for refuge, because the Lord knew that David was innocent of Saul’s accusations. David knew that if God did not rescue him, no one could.

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