Sermons

Summary: We must be in a continual state of worship.

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Psalms, Hymns, & Spiritual Songs

August 21, 2016 Morning Service

Immanuel Baptist Church, Wagoner, OK

Rick Boyne

Message Point: We must be in a continual state of worship.

Focus Passage: Colossians 3:12-17

(Coordinate with the music folks to sing "It is Well", "I Can Only Imagine" and "We're Marching to Zion" in the song service)

Introduction: “It Is Well with my Soul” was written after traumatic events in Horatio Spafford's life. The first was the death of his son at the age of 2 and the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, which ruined him financially (he had been a successful lawyer and had invested significantly in property in the area of Chicago that was extensively damaged by the great fire). His business interests were further hit by the economic downturn of 1873, at which time he had planned to travel to Europe with his family on the SS Ville du Havre. In a late change of plan, he sent the family ahead while he was delayed on business concerning zoning problems following the Great Chicago Fire. While crossing the Atlantic, the ship sank rapidly after a collision with a sea vessel, the Loch Earn, and all four of Spafford's daughters died. His wife Anna survived and sent him the now famous telegram, "Saved alone …". Shortly afterwards, as Spafford traveled to meet his grieving wife, he was inspired to write these words as his ship passed near where his daughters had died. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Is_Well_with_My_Soul]

"I Can Only Imagine" (sometimes shortened to "Imagine") is a single recorded by Christian rock band MercyMe. Written and composed by Bart Millard, the song was inspired by the death of Millard's father and considers what it would be like in Heaven and to be standing before God. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Can_Only_Imagine_(MercyMe_song)]

Bart Millard: In high school, Millard wanted to become a football player, which ended when he injured his ankles at a high school football game. As a result, Millard took choir as an elective. Millard's father died during his freshman year of college, and his youth pastor invited him to work with the church's youth group worship band. Millard accepted and worked with the video and audio systems for the group. James (Jim) Bryson played piano for that band and later went on to play with Bart Millard and the worship band on a trip to Switzerland. This trip inspired Millard to pursue a full-time musical career. Millard and two of his friends moved to Oklahoma City, and formed MercyMe. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bart_Millard]

There was a time when the question of whether to sing Psalms or hymns in church services was an issue. Isaac Watts was the lifelong champion of the humanly composed hymns while the majority of the English speaking churches insisted on the more traditional Psalms singing. It is said that tempers actually frequently flared and some churches actually split in the heat of the decidedly inharmonious musical conflict. In some churches however, a compromise was reached. Because of the controversy between singing of Psalms and the singing of hymns, the church decided to sing Psalms at the beginning of their service and then after the preaching, they would sing hymns. Many people who were still against the hymns would get up and leave the service at this time. Yes – Many people would walk out of the church when the hymns were sung in protest. Isaac Watts wrote the hymn, “We’re Marching to Zion,” to refute this practice of people walking out during the hymn singing. Just read the words especially stanza two again and you will understand the author’s indictment of those people who he says ”refuse to sing.” [https://austinbhebe.wordpress.com/2013/01/07/were-marching-to-zion/] By the way, Isaac Watts also wrote, “Joy to the World,” “At the Cross,” and “When I survey the Wondrous Cross”.


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