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Summary: Rahab lived in a doomed city, but she reached out in faith to the enemy, to become one of them, and find salvation.

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As we continue our study of Joshua, and how to have a victorious Christian life-the first obstacle a person comes to is the world. Some have suggested that Jericho, the first city across the Jordan in Israel, represents the world; the king of Jericho Satan, the god of this world. When it comes to have victory over the world, its not as easy as just strolling up to it, and to its king and saying: "give up!" The world is not going away that easily - its tentacles can reach quite deep into our lives, and Satan will not go away that easily either. He loves to stick around and tempt us or taunt us.

To begin to have victory over the world you have to give up; give up on your own strength and ability to win without God; give up on figuring the world or the enemy out. Instead we trust in the Lord, find allies where we are going and discern the attitude of our enemy, rather than all his defenses.

Today we learn about two people: the spies sent in to check out Jericho, and the woman they meet-the unlikely hero of the Jericho campaign: a prostitute named Rahab.

Verse 1

Rahab means "proud" or "roomy"

Question 1: Why go to a prostitute’s house? Perhaps Jericho was so sinful that prostitutes were pretty common. Or perhaps it was as far as they dared to go in Jericho, since her house was right on the edge of town, but the gate. It’s also possible that going to a prostitute’s house would not arouse as much suspicion. There is some suggestion that they met Rahab outside of Jericho and hatched this plan. I am not sure the text supports this, but it is possible.

Verses 2 - 7

The flatroofed houses were perfect for drying grain like flax. She is apparently a pretty good liar, and though lying is not condoned, in the case of the life or death of God’s people, it is allowed. This reminds me of those who hid the Jews during Nazi Germany.

Verses 8 - 9

I like how this is a story of salvation and God’s grace. Here Rahab represents us. We are "proud" of ourselves and don’t realize how retched we are. She 1) hears about who God is (righteous), what it means to her (peril) and then confesses her faith in God and asks for God’s mercy. She knew she was a sinner and was doomed to destruction and needed salvation.

It reminds me of the Passover, and of the original spies who went into the land and came back with quite a different report. They made their assessment based on physical appearance, not heart reality. Physically the people of the land were like giants, but in their hearts they quaked with fear of the Lord. How often do we see problems that appear like giants but do not realize the power of our God to overcome?

We see salvation-faith and works together:

Hebrews 11:31 By faith Rahab the prostitute did not perish with those who were disobedient, because she had given a friendly welcome to the spies. ESV

Rahab showed her faith by confessing the truth about herself and God.

James 2:25-26 And in the same way was not also Rahab the prostitute justified by works when she received the messengers and sent them out by another way? 26 For as the body apart from the spirit is dead, so also faith apart from works is dead. ESV


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