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Summary: It is so easy to judge and condemn the perceived selfishness of others. But rarely do we turn that discerning eye and critical judgment toward ourselves leaving our personal selfishness virtually unchallenged.

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Selfishness

Philippians 2:3-4

If you look around, you see endless examples of selfishness. We often lament their existence: We lash out at the pork spending of politicians for their constituents. We despise the self-serving culture of corporate greed. We protest the selfish motives of many wars and ruling parties. We cry out against the injustice of unnecessary poverty and hunger in an age where the 1% live ostentatious, selfish lives focused on themselves. It is so easy to judge and condemn the perceived selfishness of others. But rarely do we turn that discerning eye and critical judgment toward ourselves leaving our personal selfishness virtually unchallenged. Recognizing selfishness in others is easy. But claiming our own selfishness is more difficult to accomplish. It is, after all, far more painful to admit.

Selfishness is being concerned excessively or exclusively with oneself: seeking or concentrating on one's own advantage, pleasure, or well-being without regard for others. Selfishness is putting our goals, priorities and needs before everyone else even those who are really in need. In our scripture passage today, Paul compares selfishness to “empty conceit”—a term that could be translated “vanity” or “arrogance.” It refers to an overly high opinion of oneself. Selfishness, then, is akin to narcissism. It is often expressed by building up oneself by tearing down others. Galatians 5:20 calls it one of the “works of the flesh.” James 3:16 says it leads to “disorder and every evil practice.” Selfishness caused the children of Israel to “willfully put God to the test by demanding the food they craved.” Psalm 78:18. Selfishness caused the rich young ruler to turn his back on Jesus. Matt. 19:21-22. Selfishness ruins friendships (Proverbs 18:1) and it hinders prayer (James 4:3).

Are you selfish? To find out, take this short quiz. How would you answer these questions: I rarely let others borrow anything.

I don't lend things out unless I get something as a deposit.

Sometimes I think I ask too much of the people around me.

I don't always let the guest get first pick.

I don’t want to hear about your problems. It's not MY problem.

I’ll do anyone a favor, but expect one in return.

I take credit for things, even if it is a team’s work

I have a negative reaction when someone asks me for a donation for a charity.

The fact is we are all selfish at times. There are various degrees of selfishness, but the general traits are the same: putting yourself first, only caring about your needs and wants, being unable to see another’s perspective, and being uncaring of others. There are times we all have been guilty of one or all of those traits, but what sets self-centered people apart is that they behave that way all the time.

But are humans naturally selfish? Professor Jay Hoffman of The College of New Jersey writes, “If you don't think most of humanity is selfish, try going shopping early on Black Friday…Or try yelling "Fire" in a crowded theater. And driving anywhere these days one sees a horrific display of selfishness. Drivers are aggressively competing to get ahead of each other…”


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