Sermons

Summary: This is Part 11 in a 14-part series of studies I call “The Christian Character” as described by Jesus in what is familiarly known as the “Sermon on the Mount.” In this part Jesus tells his audience 3 things not to do for the sake of being seen. This teaching includes a model for prayer.

Part 11 - Three things to do, not to be seen by men, and a model prayer

Sermon on the Mount

The Christian Character

Matthew 5:3 - 7:27

(Cf. Luke 6:20-49)

This is Part 11 in a 14-part series of studies I call “The Christian Character” as described by Jesus as he delivered what is familiarly known as the “Sermon on the Mount.” In this part we examine three things Jesus tells his audience not to do for the sake of being seen. Part of this teaching includes a model prayer.

The 14 parts are as follows:

Part 1 – Introduction

Part 2 – Beatitudes – the poor in spirit

Part 3 - Beatitudes – those who mourn

Part 4 - Beatitudes – the meek, and those who hunger and thirst

Part 5 - Beatitudes – the merciful and the pure in heart

Part 6 - Beatitudes – peacemakers

Part 7 - Beatitudes – the persecuted and insulted

Part 8 - Salt of the earth and light of the world

Part 9 - Righteousness exceeding that of the scribes and Pharisees; divorce, oaths

Part 10 - Eye for eye, loving neighbor and hating enemy, being perfect

Part 11 - Three things to do, not to be seen by men, and a model prayer

Part 12 - Laying up treasures, eye is the lamp of the body, serving two masters

Part 13 - Do not judge, do not give what is holy to dogs and pigs

Part 14 - Ask, seek, and knock; the narrow gate; false prophets; building on the rock

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Review of last week’s class

In Matthew 5:38 Jesus says:

AN EYE FOR AND EYE, AND TOOTH FOR A TOOTH

Jesus said “You have heard…any eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.” (Read Matt 5:38-42)

That was in the Torah, and they were no strangers to it. In Numbers 35 the law provided for a procedure in the event someone accidental accidentally caused a death. Briefly, the one who accidentally killed another could flee to a “city of refuge,” pending a judgment.

The Hebrews lived in a theocracy (the laws that governed them defined and regulated both civil and religious life). Their laws provided a legal framework of remedies when a person does harm to another or his property. HOWEVER, except in the case of intentional murder, while the Law provided specific penalties and remedies, the one harmed or his kinsman was under no obligation to exact the penalty the law allowed. Jesus taught and demonstrated a better way. When you are wronged by someone, you can “let it go.”

Peter asked “Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times?” Jesus answered seventy times seven,” or 490 times. It is obvious that Jesus means forgive without limit.

Paul wrote to the Christians at Rome:

Romans 12:19 ESV “Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave it to the wrath of God, for it is written, ‘Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.'"

While civil law provides some legal mechanisms for an injured party to obtain retribution for a wrong suffered, it is by no means mandatory that those provisions be invoked.

Then Jesus made a shocking statement. Notice what the people had heard taught.

Read Matt 5:43-47

LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AND HATE YOUR ENEMY

Here is what the law says about love and hate:

Lev 19:16-18 (NIV) Do not go about spreading slander among your people. Do not do anything that endangers your neighbor's life. I am the Lord. Do not hate your brother in your heart. Rebuke your neighbor frankly so you will not share in his guilt. Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against one of your people, but love your neighbor as yourself. I am the Lord.

Why had the people heard a teaching so antithetical to what the law actually said?

To the Jews, the word “neighbor” meant someone of the Jewish race. Anyone not a Jew was an enemy, whom it was their duty to hate! Jesus gave a different a definition of a neighbor. A lawyer asked him:

Who is my neighbor?

Jesus told the story of a man on the Jericho road, robbed, stripped, beaten and left for dead. A priest and a Levite passed by him, offering no assistance. But a Samaritan man – a Samaritan man! – ministered to him. Jesus showed them that the man – A SAMARITAN! – who rendered aid to the fallen Jew was his neighbor. On the Galilean mountain, Jesus told the crowd:

Jesus’ guiding principle, both in his teaching and life was: “Love your enemies.” (Matt 5:44)

Copy Sermon to Clipboard with PRO Download Sermon with PRO
Browse All Media

Related Media


A Time For Thanks
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Giving Hands
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Giving Your Time
SermonCentral
PowerPoint Template
Talk about it...

Nobody has commented yet. Be the first!

Join the discussion