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Summary: "In the realm of reality, we need also a “shield” for our protection against doubts, uncertainties, negativism, or even false teachings that bombard us in all angles."

“For we did not follow cleverly devised stories when we told you about the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ in power, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty. He received honor and glory from God the Father when the voice came to him from the Majestic Glory, saying, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.’ We ourselves heard this voice that came from heaven when we were with him on the sacred mountain. We also have the prophetic message as something completely reliable, and you will do well to pay attention to it, as to a light shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts, knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from someone's own interpretation. For no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man, but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (2 Peter 1:16-19, NIV).

Have you heard about the fictional super-hero, Captain America? He is famous for the shield he uses to defeat his enemies.

His shield is his “primary defensive and offensive piece of equipment.” It is “virtually inde-structible...” It could absorb the powerful assault of Hulk and could repel the attack from the mystical hammer of Thor without any visible damage. And what is also interesting about it: It is able to absorb all kinetic energy and transfers very little energy from each impact – thus, Captain America does not feel so much the force of the impact on his shield.

In the realm of reality, we need also a “shield” for our protection against doubts, uncertainties, negativism, or even false teachings that bombard us in all angles. It should also be “indestructible” and could absorb all kinetic energy of error, so that we could not be affected by the destructive or negative forces.

We need to have the “SHIELD OF CERTAINTY” and that’s what we are going to focus on as we deal with our text (2 Peter 1:16-19).

So, what are those things that believers could be certain? In our text, we could find at least two. Now, what are those?

Be reminded that 2 Peter was also written by Peter, but unlike 1 Peter, it was addressed not only to the believers scattered in Asia Minor, but it was directed to all believers who stayed beyond the said place.

In 1 Peter, the writer noted the persecutions suffered by the believers, but here in 2 Peter, he pointed out the false teachings that they would face not only after his death, but even in their current situation.

It was written when it was much closer to his death in A.D. 68, as Peter wrote in verse 14 that he would soon leave his physical body.

And Peter would like the Christians then besieged with false teachings to hold on to the truth they already knew.

For us, today, we could also learn from him to defend or protect ourselves from negative thoughts, bad attitudes, or even uncertainties in this world.

So, what could the believers be certain about?

First, CERTAINTY OF THE RETURN OF CHRIST.

We read verses 16-18: “For we did not follow cleverly devised stories when we told you about the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ in power, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty. He received honor and glory from God the Father when the voice came to him from the Majestic Glory, saying, ‘This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.’ We ourselves heard this voice that came from heaven when we were with him on the sacred mountain.”

While false teachers then would say, “Where is this ‘coming’ he promised? Ever since our ancestors died, everything goes on as it has since the beginning of creation” (2 Peter 3:4), Peter assured his readers that what they related to them about Christ and His promise to return is true. While false teachers would inject just doubt, speculation or supposition, Peter declared his experience along with some other apostles (James and John), when they witnessed the transfiguration of Christ in His future glory at His return.

When he related the transfiguration of Christ in the mountain (Mark 9:2-7), Peter underscored the certainty that Jesus really rose again from the dead, “received honor and glory from the Father” and would return in power, not anymore as a helpless baby. And there was no mistake, he referred to Jesus, as Peter quoted the voice “from the Majestic Glory” – meaning, from God Himself, who said: “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.”

If the Glorious God, whom we called “our Father,” is well pleased with His begotten Son, our Savior and Lord Jesus, isn’t it that Christians should also be well pleased with Him and should love His appearing?

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